Category Archives: Listening 2 Lesbians

Lesbian voices about lesbian lives

(LVD) Cuba: Sports event – “Tortiolimpiadas” – gives lesbians visibility

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“We came to this park frequently. A friend, Leire Fernández, came up with the idea of ​​taking advantage of the visits to Monte Barreto to make some games, which she named Tortiolimpiadas, “explained Lidia Romero, a worker at Clandestina, a private enterprise that celebrates its fourth anniversary.
In Cuba, the term tortillera is used to disparately name lesbian women and its use is widespread.
(Translated)

“Veníamos frecuentemente a este parque. A una amiga, Leire Fernández, se le ocurrió la idea de aprovechar las visitas a Monte Barreto para hacer unos juegos, que nombró las Tortiolimpiadas”, explicó Lidia Romero, trabajadora de Clandestina, un emprendimiento privado que celebra su cuarto aniversario.
En Cuba, el término tortillera se emplea para nombrar despectivamente a las mujeres lesbianas y su uso está muy extendido.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.ipscuba.net/genero/tope-deportivo-visibiliza-a-lesbianas-de-cuba/ (source)

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(LVD) U.S: Photos of Lesbian Lives Meant to Inspire a Movement

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Joan E. Biren began to photograph at a time when it was almost impossible to find authentic images of lesbians and aimed to help build a movement for their liberation.

“I started photographing at a time when it was almost impossible to find authentic images of lesbians,” she said. “I wanted my photographs to be seen: I believed they could help build a movement for our liberation.”

JEB was inspired by two friends who were also mentors. “I watched them, and I read what they wrote, and I translated it into visuals that I needed to share as widely as possible,” she recalled. “Barbara Deming taught me to be still and to listen. Audre Lorde taught me to be active and to speak out.”

Continue reading: https://www.nytimes.com/2019
/04/08/lens/lesbian-lives-movement-jeb.html
(source)

(LVD) Living as a Lesbian in Iran, Where Being Gay Is Illegal


In Iran, being gay can carry a death sentence for men. Though lesbians are discussed less frequently, they too face severe government-sanctioned punishment, including lashes and flogging.
The three days Azadeh* spent in interrogation felt to her like months.
In a remote villa on the outskirts of Iran, she sat listening to clergymen preaching quotes from the Quran as the burns on her arms stung with infection.
Growing up, the 25-year-old says she was often bullied for her “boyish” looks. But several years ago, the harassment took on a more sinister form when she was arrested and tortured by Iranian Revolutionary Guards. The guards had found a short story by Azadeh about two male soldiers who were lovers during the war, after a tip-off from a girl Azadeh says held a personal grudge against her.
“I never directly used the word ‘homosexuality’ in my writings,” Azadeh says, “but they wanted to use those writings to get a confession from me that I’m a lesbian. I denied everything.”
Regardless, she was forced to undergo a three-day long “reorientation course”, which she quickly learnt was a euphemism for interrogation. It consisted, she says, of religious instruction and repeated attempts to force her to admit she was gay.
“They tortured me by pouring boiling water on my skin and beating me, especially on the head. [But] more than physical torture, I was subjected to verbal abuse,” she says. “They kept telling me that I was a ‘pussy licker’.”

Azadeh doesn’t see any contradiction between her religious beliefs and her sexual orientation. Her own (legally unofficial) marriage to a woman followed Muslim marriage rituals, and she considers her partner to be her wife in accordance with religious rules. “I used to struggle a lot to interpret the Quran in a way that was more compatible with my situation as a lesbian,” she says. “I think we need new fatwa for this issue.”

Continue reading: https://broadly.vice.com/
en_us/article/a3wvjk/living-as-a-lesbian-in-iran-where-being-gay-is-illegal
(source)

(LVD) Chile: 300 Lesbians Marching

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On March 8 in Chile was a historic day in every way, it was one of the most popular marches in our history, around 350,000 women in Santiago de Chile marching together, 800,000 throughout the country, in unison, protesting and commemorating proudly the day of the working woman. Never a march called by women had achieved such a call and for more than 30 years in Chile did not see such a massive march.
This march full of women, of all women, managed to make us all mobilize, to go out and meet thousands of compañeras who, although we did not know, we returned with every step, with every cry, with every knowing glance, our sisters.
Among all those women, of all the groups and of all the blocks in which the march was divided, one stood out full of vigor, strength and struggle. Lesbians marched together, lesbians from groups, self-convened lesbians, all marched, became visible and present. The articulator “Redlesbofeminista” called months before to play it in this historic battle and something that became impossible was taking shape.
(Translated)

El día 8 de Marzo en Chile fue un día histórico en todo sentido, fue una de las marchas mas concurridas en toda nuestra historia, alrededor de 350.000 mujeres en Santiago de Chile marchando juntas, 800.000 en todo el país, al unísono, protestando y conmemorando con orgullo el día de la mujer trabajadora. Nunca una marcha convocada por mujeres había logrado tal convocatoria y desde hace más de 30 años en Chile no se veía una marcha tan masiva.
Esta marcha llena de mujeres, de todas las mujeres, logró hacer que todas nos movilizáramos, que saliéramos y nos encontráramos con miles de compañeras que aunque no conocíamos volvíamos con cada paso, con cada grito, con cada mirada cómplice, nuestras hermanas.
Dentro de todas esas mujeres, de todas las agrupaciones y de todos los bloques en los que se dividía la marcha, uno resaltaba lleno de vigor, fuerza y lucha. Las lesbianas marchaban juntas, lesbianas de agrupaciones, lesbianas autoconvocadas, todas marchaban, se hacían visibles y presentes. La articuladora “Redlesbofeminista”, convocó meses antes a jugárnosla en esta histórica batalla y algo que se hacía imposible fue tomando forma.
(Original)

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Continue reading: https://www.eldesconcierto.cl/2019
/03/15/las-300-lesbianas-marchando/
(source)

(LVD) Toward a Black Lesbian Jurisprudence

by Theresa Raffaele Jefferson

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Black lesbians are everywhere and nowhere all at once. Throughout history we have been made invisible. This invisibility serves as a constant reminder that our culture, and indeed our very lives are considered at best illegitimate. At the same time, our identity as Black lesbians has been made hyper-visible when we have tried to remain in the wings. In these instances hyper-visibility becomes a means of punishment-a penalty for not understanding or refusing to abide by societal mandates. The experiences of Black lesbians in law and society illustrate this seeming invisibility/hyper-visibility paradox. Yet the tools of invisibility and hyper-visibility serve the same purpose-the legitimation of dominant cultural control. Invisibility and hyper-visibility compliment each other. They act in concert, as a dual cultural strategy of distortion, suppression, and punishment. A consistent Black lesbian jurisprudence has emerged whereby Black lesbians and our rights are erased at the intersection of our race, gender, and sexual orientation. This Note is an attempt to explore the lives of Black lesbians, to uncover law and society’s desire for us to remain seen or unseen depending on the context, and to provide a starting point for others to conduct future research.

Continue reading: https://racism.org/articles/
intersectionality/sexual-orientation/2616-toward-a-black-lesbian
(source)

(LVD) Spain: “We feel more secure in the town than in the city”

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A recent investigation conducted by the professor of the University of Cantabria Noelia Fernández-Rouco in which three other teachers have collaborated has analyzed the satisfaction of lesbian women in the Spanish rural environment, pointing out the main difficulty they face: the obstacles to find mutual support networks in these communities. “There are issues with a more particular character, which have to do mainly with access to resources, with distance or anonymity, although it sounds contradictory, “explains the author. “When the stigma is very present, it is what people seek, and for that they move from their places of origin or need them to present sufficient resources to form these networks or facilitate the possibility of meeting people.”
(Translated)

Una reciente investigación dirigida por la profesora de la Universidad de Cantabria Noelia Fernández-Rouco en la que han colaborado otros tres profesores ha analizado la satisfacción de las mujeres lesbianas del entorno rural español, señalando la principal dificultad a la que deben enfrentarse: las trabas para encontrar redes de apoyo mutuo en estas comunidades. “Hay cuestiones con un carácter más particular, que tienen que ver sobre todo con el acceso a recursos, con la distancia o el anonimato, aunque suene contradictorio”, explica a este medio la autora. “Cuando el estigma está muy presente, es lo que buscan las personas, y para eso se desplazan de sus lugares de origen o necesitan que estos presenten recursos suficientes que permitan formar estas redes o faciliten la posibilidad de conocer gente”.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.elconfidencial.com/alma-corazon-vida/2019-04-12/lesbiana-espana-rural-beso-novia_1938214/ (source)

 

(LVD) Australia: Thanks To Lesbian Stand-Up Hannah Gadsby We Are FINALLY Seen

By Julia Diana Robertson

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Hannah Gadsby, a suit-rocking lesbian, just put out a Netflix stand-up special, and you MUST go watch it now. As a matter of fact, anyone who cares at all about a lesbian, needs to watch it now. I’d go so far as to say, it should be mandatory. It’s groundbreaking. Unprecedented. Monumental. Certainly one of the best things I’ve ever seen. I laughed (a lot) & cried. And I don’t cry easily. I’m a tough nut to crack—been shot at, seen b*mbs, and my tears are typically relegated to the privacy of a locked bathroom—So lesbians, when I say something powerful went down, I mean something powerful went down. Plus, added bonus, she uses the word lesbian about 100 times.

Gadsby wants her audience to feel the tension because they should know, if only briefly, the tension that women like her feel “all the time.”  Because of this dangerous attitude—‘If you want to look like a man, I’ll beat you like a man’—has been upheld, while the world carries on around us. In 2018, while rule-breaking lesbians are still relegated to a punchline, the mainstream will currently feature— with dignity and style—anyone, whether L, G, B, or T, so long as they adhere to the ‘rules’ of ‘gender’. Gadsby poignantly saysIf I’d been ‘feminine’, that would not have happened. I am ‘incorrectly’ female.” And that’s what the media tells us every single day of our lives… we are “‘incorrectly’ female.”

But despite her anger, depression and #metoo stories, she doesn’t want to be seen as a victim. “There is nothing stronger than a broken woman who has rebuilt herself,” she says valiantly. And I agree. Gadsby is now added to a proud history of suit-wearing lesbian warriors—And those warriors are often the best that womanhood has to offer.

WE ARE NOT A PUNCHLINE. Thanks to Gadsby, our voice FINALLY broke into the mainstream. And IT’S ABOUT. F*CKING. TIME.

Continue reading: https://www.afterellen.com/general-news/560969-thanks-to-lesbian-stand-up-hannah-gadsby-we-were-finally-seen-and-its-about-fcking-time (source)

(LVD) South Africa: Lesbians Fight for Acceptance in the Rainbow Nation

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Being a lesbian in South Africa can be a death sentence.
Nondi, Vee and over one hundred others came to the Isini Sam conference to meet and strategize on how to fight the hate and end the violence. They discussed how to better represent themselves and advocate as a cohesive group, how to combat stigmas and misconceptions, as well as how to better work with the police and community members.
“In South Africa we are free. But in our communities that we are living in, here in Khayelitsha, we are not free,” Jara said.
“We are trying to bring the community to also understand and to accept that we are humans and we are here and also that we are someone’s daughter or mother or sister,” Vokwana said.
They stress the similarities between all people. Many are quick to assert that while they are activists, their sexuality does not define them. They want to be seen as equals, as humans and accepted by their families, community, in the eyes of the law and by members of the police.
Those at the conference have chosen to speak out, but this choice comes with a price.
But activists still meet, organize and fight.
At the conference attendees broke into small groups to discuss plans for lobbying, greater visibility, training for police and ways to talk with their community members, family members and friends. They sang and danced and celebrated knowing they were among friends, among comrades, and for a while, they were safe.
They brought different viewpoints, had their own hopes for the movement and opinions on how to get there, but they shared a common goal.
Written on a white easel, a unanimously agreed upon goal from one of the groups said, “Look at me beyond my sexuality. Look at me as a human being.”

Continue reading: https://pulitzercenter.org/
reporting/south-africa-fight-acceptance-rainbow-nation
(source)

Lesbian Visibility Day 2019 (LVD)

By Liz Waterhouse

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, lesbian visibility in even the most lesbian friendly nations is under threat both from traditional sources, and within communities that purport to support us.

We see this evidenced by representation in LGBTI organisation reports and funding:

Data source: Source: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sfos0060/LGBT_figures.shtml

We also see a decrease in lesbians who feel comfortable naming themselves as such,  under pressure from both a lesbophobic society and a male dominated community, neither of which support female-focused women.

Female-only same sex attraction has faced centuries of opposition as an “immoral” practise, and that opposition has been embraced and reframed lesbianism as exclusionary and bigoted.

Even within media from our own community it is difficult to source information on the global experiences of lesbians, although the lesbians of the world face double oppression as women and homosexuals.

Furthermore we see an ongoing war waged against women who do not demonstrate femininity or comply with the female sex role, with women continuing to be encouraged to see gender non conformity or gender resistance as evidence of masculinity.

And while lesbian visibility is under threat, the concrete situation for lesbians around the world remains dire. The world remains male dominated, with female exploitation underpinning social structures.  The situation is exacerbated by widespread and powerful religious opposition, vestiges of colonial homophobia, brutal racism and the rise in sharply right wing politics in many countries and regions.

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, as always, Listening2Lesbians focuses on lesbians, lesbian experiences and lesbian resistance around the world.

We ask you to support lesbians and do the same.

Liz and Ari, Listening2Lesbians

Older lesbians deserve recognition as feminist pioneers and sisters

by Claire Heuchan
AfterEllen.com

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Older lesbians have given so much to feminist and gay organizing that their erasure as the pioneers of both communities feels nothing short of criminal. And yet, much like mainstream society, so much of queer culture centers youth and masculinity that it is fundamentally unequipped to acknowledge the significance of older lesbians within the community.

Continue reading: Older lesbians deserve recognition as feminist pioneers and sisters

Report released into new sexual coercion of lesbians

By Angela C Wild
Get the L Out UK

Lesbians at Ground Zero

“The consequence of systematic lesbian erasure, combined with the male centred politics of the LGBT, is a constant invasion: invasion of lesbian spaces and invasion of the lesbian body as the ultimate women-only space, leading to the destruction of those spaces and the consequent destruction of lesbianism.

While experiences of sexual violence were reported by women from every age group, the younger 18-24 age group seemed to be particularly targeted. The sexual violence experiences reported by respondents range from coercion, online grooming, sexual harassment and assault to rape by deception or with physical force. Perpetrators have used queer theory mixed with guilt-tripping to pressure, justify or excuse sexual violence.”

Continue reading at: Lesbians at Ground Zero link  (Source)

Lesbian Rights in the Declaration of Women’s Sex-Based Rights

Guest post by Tina Minkowitz

Tina Minkowitz is a human rights lawyer who mostly works on the rights of people with disabilities, in particular for the abolition of forced psychiatric interventions. Her LLM thesis Female Autonomy vs Gender Identity: a critical analysis of gender identity in CEDAW jurisprudence and the Yogyakarta Principles is available online and may also be of interest to readers.

Lesbian Rights

As a lesbian, it is important to me that the Declaration on Women’s Sex-Based Rights includes us explicitly.

The Declaration is an initiative by women to argue for our rights as a female sex, oppressed by gender as a system of male supremacy and sex stereotypes.  It is designed to counter the ideology of gender identity that maintains sex is irrelevant and only subjective identification with one or another gender matters.  This ideology, which harms women and girls by allowing men to access female-only spaces – both physical spaces and symbolic ones –  including those created by and for lesbians, has become increasingly influential in human rights discourse.

Lesbians are one of the groups of women most impacted by transgender identity politics.  There are no safe public spaces that we can take for granted – in countries where we had won a superficial tolerance, lesbians are being pushed out of our own spaces by men who claim that they are us, and if we do not want to have sex with them we are bigots.  We may have marriage equality, but we are caught between resurgent religious fundamentalism on the right, and a demand that we relinquish female-only space – whether bathrooms, showers, dormitories, sports, lesbian chatrooms and dating apps – on the left.  We are already marginalized in straight-dominant society, at risk of violence and ostracism for being lesbian or for not fitting the stereotypical patterns of women’s lives, appearance, behavior in a world that expects men to lead and women to serve them.

The Declaration recognizes that rights related to sexual orientation are necessary for lesbians to exercise our rights and says that men’s claims to be lesbians discriminates undermines lesbians’ rights and is a form of discrimination against women.

It specifically calls for the legal use of the term ‘woman’ to mean adult human female, and the term ‘lesbian’ to mean adult human female whose sexual orientation is towards other adult human females; and for the recognition of the rights of lesbians to assemble and associate on the basis of common sexual orientation, without including men who claim to have female ‘gender identities’.

It could have gone further perhaps, to call for women’s sexual autonomy and right to autonomous sexuality explicitly as one of the overarching rights (e.g. sexual integrity, as it does call for reproductive integrity).  It also could have addressed lesbians’ existence in violation of sex stereotypes.  Nevertheless, it has potential to bring lesbians into human rights discourse on our own terms, for us to expand on this space.  There are plans in progress for global consultation that may result in updating or additions, as more women become involved and the Declaration is translated into languages other than English.

The Declaration is not an official document of the United Nations.  However, using the language of human rights and making an argument based on UN human rights instruments gives us a basis to advocate to UN mechanisms like the Commission on the Status of Women and the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.  This in turn can help to shape global political debates, and those in our own countries.

Read the Declaration at https://www.womensdeclaration.com and consider signing it to show your support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being lesbian in Sri Lanka

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“When I was 14 years old I realised I totally liked women. The other party was an English teacher. But at that time there was no word “lesbian” around me, only confusion. No one told me. Or everyone treated homosexuality as something that should not be.”

She has found the word “lesbian” that represents her mind on the Internet, but that was not yet common. When I confessed to my parents, they said, “It’s a transient illness,” and her parents also cried or got angry. Then she spent her teens without telling anyone.
(Translated)

自分が完全に女性が好きだと気が付いたのが14歳のとき。相手は英語の先生だった。でもその当時は自分の周りには”レズビアン”という言葉はなく、ただ混乱するのみ。誰も教えてくれなかった。というか誰もが同性愛はあってはいけないものと扱っていた。

彼女はまだ一般的でなかったインターネットでなんとか自分の心を表す”レズビアン”という言葉を見つけた。両親に打ち明けると「それは一過性の病気」と言われ、彼女の両親も泣いたり、怒ったり。それから彼女は誰にも打ち明けることのないまま10代を過ごした。

(Original)

In Memoriam: Lesbian Murder Victims (March 2019 Update)

Lesbians in Memoriam

We honour the following sisters:
  • Brenda Lorena Alvarado Montoya (2019) – Tegucigalpa, Honduras
  • Thuthukile Mabasa (2018) – Capetown, South Africa
  • Nicole Saavedra (2016) – Valparaiso, Brazil
  • Sidney Loofe (2017) – Nebraska, USA
  • Anne Mikaelly (2018) – Brasilia, Brazil
  • Unathi Bixa (2017) – Capetown, South Africa
  • Charlene Ranstrom and Brenda Warner (1988) – Nashua, New Hampshire
  • Cassie Hayes (2018) – Southport, Mercyside, England
  • Marielle Franco (2018) – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Elke W. and Beate N. (2016) – Gersthofen-Hirblingen, Germany
  • Anisha and Joey van Niekerk (2017) – Magaliesberg, South Africa
  • Kaladaa Crowell (and her 11 year-old daughter, Kyra Inglett) (2017) – West Palm Beach, Florida, USA
  • Noxolo Xakeka (2018) – Lwandle, South Africa
  • Kerrice Lewis (2018) – Washington, D.C., USA
  • Shanta Myers and Brandi Mells (and Shanta’s two children, Shanise Myers and Jeremiah Myers) (2017)  – Troy, New York, USA
  • Josanne Maria Almeida da Silva and Ana Paula da Silva Pereira (2017) – Manaus, Brazil
  • Quezia Kassya (2017) – San Paulo, Brazil
  • Georgann Lee Smith (2009) – Sarasota, Florida, USA
  • Ana Flávia Leitão (2017) – Cataguases, Brazil
  • Irani Ribeiro de Medeiros (2017) – Várzea Grande (Mato Grosso), Brazil.
  • Felicia Dormans (2017) – Mount Holly, New Jersey, USA.
  • Lyndsey Vaux (2016) – Wigan, United Kingdom

Continue reading at: http://inmemoriamlesbian.blogspot.com/

TO KILL A WOMAN, YOU DON’T NEED MUCH – THE STORY OF A CHECHEN LESBIAN WHO FLED FROM RUSSIA

To kill a lesbian in Chechnya

My family learned about my orientation from my girlfriend. She told my family – I do not know why. She is not a Chechen. After that, I started having problems, and I stopped communicating with her. I ran away from home twice. The first time I ran away, I was actively searched. Where I am hiding, my girlfriend told my relatives. After that, one of the brothers came for me, and we went home. My mother was unhappy with this. She told her brother: “Why did you bring her home? You should have shot her somewhere in the forest, as we agreed. ” But the brother did not do it – my father forbade him to do it.
(Translated)

О моей ориентации домашние узнали от моей девушки. Она рассказала моей семье – не знаю зачем. Она не чеченка. После этого у меня начались проблемы, и я перестала с ней общаться. Я дважды убегала из дома. В первый раз, когда я убежала, меня активно искали. Где я скрываюсь, моим родственникам рассказала моя девушка. После этого за мной приехал один из братьев, и мы поехали домой. Моя мама была недовольна этим. Она сказала брату: «Зачем ты привез ее домой? Ты должен был ее где-нибудь в лесу расстрелять, как мы и договаривались». Но брат этого не сделал – мой отец запретил ему это делать.
(Original)

Continue reading at: https://www.currenttime.tv/a/chechen-lgbt-refugee-monologue/29769095.html

Black Lesbian Resistance and Resilience: Sheila Alexander-Reid

Women in the Life 1994

Women in the Life Magazine in its second year of publication in 1994.

“In 1992, I started Women in the Life, Inc., an events management company that created safe spaces for Black lesbians to interact through dance parties, concerts, fundraisers, and open mic poetry sessions in over 50 locations in Washington, D.C. alone, not to mention Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Atlanta. Some of the many artists featured at Women in the Life events included Grace JonesC+C Music FactoryCeCe PenistonMeshell Ndegecocello, R. Erica DoyleSamiya A. BashirKarma Mayet JohnsonPamela SneedMichelle ParkersonVenus ThrashMichaela HarrisonBarbara Tucker, ONYX, and Staceyann Chinn. Over a ten-year period, with the help of friends Charlene Hamilton, Darlene Rogers, Chris Vera, Lois Alexander, the late Phyllis Croom and so many more, I published a total of 86 issues of Women in the Life Magazine, which addressed issues that impacted our community both in Washington, D.C., throughout the United States, and internationally. The magazine was distributed nationally.

Continue reading at: https://thefeministwire.com/2019/02/black-lesbian-resistance-and-resilience/

AfterEllen’s Response to NBC OUT (Full Statement)

by Memoree Joelle
AfterEllen.com

“Lesbians should absolutely be “allowed” to have a mainstream publication. We should absolutely be allowed to discuss issues (documented and evidence-based realities) that lesbians are currently facing, as they specifically pertain to and affect lesbians.

Being an ally should not require lesbians to deny their own reality. It should not require lesbians to relinquish all autonomy, to believe exactly as others do, or fall silent.

This goes much deeper than a simple statement. There’s been an ongoing campaign of homophobia directed exclusively at lesbians, and when our writers try to cover these issues, as they specifically pertain to and affect lesbians, we’re shouted down by non-lesbians with slurs and anti-lesbian sentiment. Enough is enough.”

Continue reading: AfterEllen’s Response to NBC OUT (Full Statement) (source)

Harassment and teasing: what lesbians live in Peru

Carolia Silva Santisteban

If I go out with my girlfriend or with the girl that I am in that moment I have to consider in what district I am to know how expressive I am going to be for my integrity and the safety of the person who accompanies me. I have a male gender expression … I am exposed to teasing and insults.
(Translated)

Si yo salgo con mi novia o con la chica que estoy en ese momento tengo que considerar en qué distrito estoy para saber qué tan expresiva voy a ser por mi integridad y la seguridad de la persona que me acompaña. También está el acoso callejero. Tengo una expresión de género masculina… Estoy expuesta a burlas e insultos.
(Original)

Continue reading at: https://peru21.pe/peru/carolina-silva-santisteban-lesbiana-peru-464305 (Source)

Lesbian Mothers and the Serbian Government

Every lesbian kiss is a revolution

European Lesbian* Conference has been following closely the lesbian Serbian news lately. As the lesbian Prime Minister Ana Brnabic and her partner were expecting a child, our Strategy Dykerector Dragana Todorovic gave several interviews to the media to explain how very peculiar this situation was.

The child is now born and this birth led to the burst of lesbophobic comments. One of the opposition leaders even said «The children are hungry in this country and the son of the Prime ministre can feed on four boobs». Lepa Mladjenovic, a legend of lesbian activism, sent us  a text to react to this news. Her words on the situation of lesbian mothers and the lesbophobia in Serbia are very powerful. We thank her very much for sharing this with all of you, and wish you all a great reading.

Continue reading at: https://europeanlesbianconference.org/lesbian-mothers-and-the-serbian-government-by-lepa-mladjenovic/ (Source)

Burundi: The secret language of lesbian love

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Over a period of a few months, the BBC spoke to dozens of young lesbians in a country where homosexuality is illegal. They told us about their day-to-day lives and how they use secret memes to connect with each other on social media platforms and chat apps.

“There are ‘invisible’ lesbians in every country. We are just one part of it.”

“If we exist here, we exist everywhere.”

We need to be heard.”

If you know that we exist, you may start looking for us in your own communities, and in your own families.”

Continue reading at: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/resources/idt-sh/secret_lesbian_language (source)