Category Archives: Listening 2 Lesbians

Lesbian voices about lesbian lives

Lesbian. by Lisa Luxx

“A poem about the public lesbian experience and how the word ‘lesbian’ has become so hostile it is even taboo among our own communities, and outside our community it is mostly used as a slur or a porn category. Dedicated to the victims of increased hate crimes this pride. Filmed and directed by Tamara al-Mashouk.”

Words by Lisa Luxx.

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Lesbian activist Gerald Hayo: corrective rape is a common practice in Kenya

Gerald Hayo

Kenya is one of the 70 countries in the world that as of March 2019 criminalizes having sex with someone of the same sex. Currently, being gay in Kenya is punishable by up to 14 years in prison. The situation is aggravated if you are a lesbian woman, as is the case of Gerald Hayo, who survived a multiple corrective rape organized by her own family. The activist is now dedicating her life to fighting for the rights of lesbian, bisexual and queer (LBQ) women in the African country. Fire!!, the International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival in Barcelona, ​​has premiered the documentary Now you are woman by journalist Alba Muñoz, in which Hayo tells her story to the world. At a time when talking involves exposing oneself, Hayo wants to break with the systematic silence that makes invisible the violations of human rights and the inequality suffered by Kenyan women who do not follow the mandate of heterosexuality.
(Translated)

Kenia es uno de los 70 países del mundo que a fecha de marzo de 2019 criminaliza tener relaciones con alguien de tu mismo sexo. Actualmente, ser homosexual en Kenia se castiga con hasta 14 años de prisión. La situación se agrava si eres una mujer lesbiana, como es el caso de Gerald Hayo, que sobrevivió a una violación múltiple correctiva organizada por su propia familia. La activista dedica ahora su vida a luchar por los derechos de las mujeres lesbianas, bisexuales y queer (LBQ) del país africano. Fire!!, la Muestra Internacional de cine Gay y Lésbico de Barcelona, ha estrenado … el documental Now you are woman de la periodista Alba Muñoz, en el que Hayo relata su historia al mundo. En un momento en el que hablar supone exponerse, Hayo quiere romper con el silencio sistemático que invisibiliza las vulneraciones de derechos humanos y la desigualdad que sufren las mujeres keniatas que no siguen el mandato de la heterosexualidad.
(Original)

Continue reading at: https://www.elsaltodiario.com/kenia/gerald-hayo-las-violaciones-correctivas-a-mujeres-lbq-son-una-practica-comun-en-kenia- (Source)

I was a lesbian tomboy allowed to be female; I fear young girls today no longer have that choice

by Tonje Gjevjon
for feministcurrent.com

8.Tonje-16-year-72-dpi-JPEG.jpeg

The shame of belonging to a group of so-called “manly” women was widespread and self-loathing not uncommon. There is no shortage of people who ridicule lesbians’ appearances, and who think lesbians shouldn’t be so “lesbian.”

What this really means is that these people think lesbians should conform to stereotypical gender roles: be more feminine, wear makeup, dress and move like “real women.” These attitudes haven’t changed significantly in the last 30-40 years. Even some lesbian or bisexual women express annoyance with the “masculine” lesbians. It’s as if they think masculine lesbians shame lesbians as a whole.

Today, many young lesbians can’t bring themselves to call themselves lesbians, because they associate being lesbian with something ugly and shameful — a failed and unwomanly woman.

Continue reading: https://www.feministcurrent.com/
2019/06/11/i-was-a-lesbian-tomboy-allowed-to-be-female-i-fear-young-girls-today-no-longer-have-that-choice/
(source)

I carry a list of their names

Mersiha

Mersiha (left) (Image courtesy of Dr Danica Anderson, with Mersiha’s permission)

 

A guest post by Dr Danica Anderson

I carry a list of their names

I will name her Mersiha for purposes of protection.

She must have been standing by the tall war weary grey and riddled with bullets apartment building. Otherwise, she would not have been able to unexpectedly show up in Sana Koric’s photo shop located on the ground floor of the building.

The door swung open making the bell ring out aggressively.  My back was to her – it is a shield to pitch away the spewing incoherent words that came out her mouth.

It felt strange with Sana standing at her register smoking on her cigarette as if the door being ripped open violently was normal. It was even stranger with Sana calmly greeting her as she would any customer or person- you know the typical question ‘how are you’ but didn’t want to be bothered with any answer.

Sana’s response made me turned around to look at intruder.  For a moment, I thought I didn’t hear the spewing incoherent words.  But, Mersiha’s agitation was shown with her arms raised and flaying with no apparent target. Somewhere in that moment her eyes locked with mine despite her being imprisoned in her mental illness tirade.   Mersiha saw I was listening intently to all she said and all her movements without fear.

I could not but help to see her and this registered deeply upon her.

But, I was questioning internally how this forgotten invisible woman is smothered with precursory greetings and ignored.  I wondered hasn’t there been someone who was questioning and curious about her life and how she got into a state.  I know in the aftermath of war, the small town- Novi Travnik being invisible meant everyone walks by her as if she did not exist.  Or murder her for being lesbian.

By seeing and listening to her, I discovered her collection of spewed incoherent sentences are underlined with an intelligence.

Abruptly, she said, “you do not live here….. I can talk to you”.

In that one extremely touching statement she said to me pointed unquestionably to the fact she was shunned and swirled in an ocean of silence.

I was vulnerably placed in the bearing witness mode in an instant.

I, also, knew if Mersiha could respond to me in those few moments a healing social collective would provide the environment for this woman to accept the trauma she experienced and still endures.

I hesitate with medications since I knew she certainly did not get any with the humanitarian aid agencies nor the money to have meds consistently. My internal witness was chattering that I had no medications to give only my clinical assessment and being a sister to women in need.   I already witnessed how lesbians are prescribed more anti-depressants and anti- psychotics which in all likelihood created the mental illnesses in the male medical model[1].  The male medical model is a pathologization another form swearing allegiances for patriarchal authority that rally to save normal[2] as heterosexual.

I knew to expect the unexpected in the region that experienced 100 years of war. Basically, I am in a war zone that never ends the hate and violence.  I knew from so many experiences in the killing fields across the globe that knowing their hidden truth can be very costly especially when their hidden truth is liberated.

I learned in each of these experiences that it’s critical to illustrate the importance of bearing witness especially in environments of hate and violence.  It allows the survivors to struggle with a vocabulary and relate their herstories to those who stand ready to hear their hidden truth.

I am not talking about testimonies either. Many war women crimes and war survivors encountered the modern day courts and rule of law call for testimony, a word that has its origins of males swearing on their testicles for their allegiances in patriarchal rule[3].  Given the patriarchal and manmade law there is no room for women’s breasts of nurturance and wombs to birth their narratives in order to complete the process of their survival.  Her life story is incapable of being repossessed and reclaimed.

The result is that the women survivors live in a dangerous hideout unable to leave and unable to have a coherent, integrated narrative of what happened and continues to happen for her.  Women survivors are erased and made invisible in the testimonies since they are without testicles to prove their truths of realities are self-evident.

I looked at Sana standing at her register steadily smoking.  I thought of the some twenty Bosnian Muslim women war crimes and war survivors I work with in Novi Travnik.   The female social collective is inherent with those women but many were uneducated, older women who lived through WWII and the Balkan War who are certainly strongly steeped in Bosnian male dogma for testicles swearing allegiances.

Sana’s coolly smoking her cigarette and warm greetings to her enables a silence that in the end kills female social collective solidarity.   The killing silence is a jailer that has thrown away the keys to the cage. No matter of support, love and care is nurtured and if done it is in a repressed underground passive behavior.  My own hidden truth and that of the Bosnian female social collective I work with and love dearly are, also, complicit in this killing silence of women who are mentally and/or physically broken down.

It is more than that, I would discover later after hearing Mersiha’s story from Sana that “she was a crazed lesbian woman”.  I cringed when Sana spoke of what happened to her during the Balkan War.  I asked Sana why it matters that this woman is a lesbian when the violence towards women includes all daughters.

To remain authentic to myself and for these Bosnian women war crimes and war survivors I worked on their interpretation because it invariably plays a decisive formative role in who one comes to be, and in how a person lives their own life.  The so-called crazed woman according to the women war crimes and war survivors, the woman I encountered in Sana’s photo shop became untouchable – a lesbian that was not allow her to experience the traumatic events in her life without a witness, or her internal witness and she became trapped and warped in mental incapacities.

It matters because the murdering of lesbians sets an environment of terrorization for all women. We have mothers and their lesbian daughters who desperately want their daughters’ sexual agency quiet and unheard of to avoid the courts and rule of law call for testimony.    Women need to go deeper given that the alibi or being repatriated back home is the absence of death.  It is a quality of knowledge about their traumatic experiences and its relationship to struggle with death anxiety. In the end, it means being an insincere witness to themselves and her. We are unable to witness the violence in silencing lesbian’s reality of living in a world of hate.

To this day no one would want to publicly admit Mersiha is lesbian, it is for a very good reason.   Of the few lesbians I have met outside of Sarajevo city, the rural regions have many lesbians who have disappeared or camouflaged themselves. The same alibi is given when I ask where she is.  The universal response is – she has been repatriated back home.

The lesbians I searched for are the ‘disappeared’ and most likely murdered and tortured and raped.

I carry the names of lesbians asking authorities (all male by the way) – where did these women go?  Novi Travnik’s mayor, a short man in his early fifties told me right after I heatedly stated that these women have disappeared, “I knew we were in recovery when Novi Travnik had a beauty salon.  Maybe she will come back and get her hair done.”   I will spare you the expletives in my response to him.  But, I did say sramota- shame on you.

I ask the towns’ people randomly about the names of women who have gone missing.   The same response is given.   I walk away with bowed shoulders and in the beginning I would cry but now my female rage, a social justice burns ferociously.

Sana told me Mersiha and her partner traveled to many places before the war.   During the Balkan war Sana reported her partner left – abandoned her.   It was then, she had a break from reality.

Mersiha left her apartment and the door open.   Since it was war the entire apartment was ransacked.  Sana did not know where she went only that she was in town.   I took this to mean she lived on the streets.  It is unknown how her days were spent during the war and up until the time I encountered her in 2004.

After Mersiha left Sana’s photo office, I turned to Sana asking how the women I have come to know allow this happen.   I said to make this right, she needs Kolo Sumejia- a social collective and let’s work on that and see about getting her a place to live.  Of course, it was more of a demand.

I have a female rage shrouded with female social justice which set up my bravery to ask the small group of elderly women I work with to nurture and heal.  I knew I was shaming them- rather I was holding the women accountable for our killing silence which is painful for them and me.

Within few years, I returned to Novi Travnik and there Mersiha was sitting on a bench with an older woman, a friend who now share their apartment together.   While it was not a Lesbian partnership it was woman to woman, a female social justice that the women war crimes and war survivors in Novi Travnik do under the radar of male dominated society.

She smiled at me and waved her hand for me to come over to the bench.  I walked over and could not help smiling.   She introduced me to her friend saying she is better and on medications.   I turned to leave and she touched my arm.   I turned back and she said, you knew I existed.  You listened.

She is the only lesbian I found alive on my list of names.  I realized the female social collective did not give me an alibi – ‘repatriated back home’ when I asked after her.   I still ask about the other names on my list but it’s been over 18 years now.

What I learned after decades treating trauma across the globe is that I can’t change the world, erase the killing silences or save everyone.   My small act, my one response to witness and listen to one woman rippled into a female social collective that ended up healing her and many others.   I know it is only one name out of my list of names, one encounter and a dialogue that powerfully heals the experiences from those who have been victimized or subjected to it but, I heard a deeper truth not the killing silence or that alibi that she has been repatriated back home.

 

Bosnian Female Collective; a Human Geography

In Novi Travnik[4], Bosnia Herzegovina, I created the female social collective with the Bosnian women war crimes and war survivors.  The women named the social collective Kolo[5] Sumejia.  Sumejia is from the Quran, a female martyr.  The Ahmica-Vitez grandmothers and the Kolo Sumejia are the female social collectives where I would learn how they heal trauma and witness their grief and our own grief at the same time.

Only a few kilometers away from Novi Travnik is the village Ahmica-Vitez, the site of war crimes. Similar to Novi Travnik, a street divides the Ahmica Muslim enclave from the Croatians[6].  150 elderly and mostly women and children to infants were slaughtered in the Muslim morning call to prayer[7].  The war crimes here at Ahmica-Vitez was done by Croats not Serbs.

The human geography of the Balkan War and war crimes would have the grandmothers out in the field with their livestock which saved their lives but not their children and grandchildren.

If you drive another five kilometers away from Novi Travnik it is startlingly to the point of disbelief since Travnik is one of the most beautiful places in Eastern Europe.  Travnik is smacked in the middle of Mt. Vlasic’s soaring cliffs.  One road is the only entrance and exit that leads to Mt. Vlasic.  Blue Waters rage down from a stout Tower with stone walls witch’s castle and flows underground and then emerges above ground into Travnik. Austria’s Archduke Ferdinand drank coffee at the Blue Waters café in 1914.  The Mosque has its minaret on the wrong side due to the raging blue waters that roar through the town.

Mt Vlasic serves as the backbone of the town, actually the protector of the town. And the thousands of internal displaced people (IDPs) – refugees in their own country would flee to Travnik.

During the Balkan War (1991-1993) over 5,000 women- IDPs, refugees and those from the rape camps fled to Travnik[8].  Snipers were able to kill some. The women talked about how their mothers and grandmothers’ covered up their windows and knew how to outlast the sieges and sniper kills to the market via their wood stoves and their fermented and home canned goods.

In other words, after three world wars -100 years of war – intergenerational trauma conjures up the survivor skills not thriving skills. It also conjures up the women’s silence on their own daughters’ sexual agency, not just Muslim women but, especially, if lesbians or haven been raped.

The rape survivors knew from before the war how Travnik was geographical situated to protect IDPs – refugees.   We do know in the Balkan War rape camps held elder women- mostly educated with doctorates and/or held high positions with a majority of Muslim young women.  There is talk that many of the educated women were lesbians but it is never spoken about or referred to in most media and research.

From my kolo informed trauma work not just in Bosnia but across the globe, lesbians’ trauma events and trauma response comes from their unassimilable experiences since their commitment to the truth of their realities is a journey with the ultimate difference-the otherness of living and otherness of death.

Two outstanding elements stood out for me in the literature about these rape camps showing the killing silence; no mention or few children of rape were born and no mention of Lesbian women.   The extremes of what women endured and lesbians are not in the written historical accounts and if chronicled it is rare.  The otherness of women’s lives, their sexual identity and sexual agency cannot efface the gynocide (mass murder of women).  But it does demand a repossession of her witnessing her loss and suffering when she recounts the experience of otherness, separation and loss.

Since, there is no mention or witnessing lesbians among the 5,000 women rape survivors and refugees I decided to detail traces of their lesbian lives at the local communities I found myself in. Even the UN statistics did not have Lesbians enumerated and they were most likely folded into the women category[9].  Of course it is fine to have lesbians noted as women – true women who in my tacit knowledge[10] is our first mother who had to be lesbian and all women have the capacity for parthenogenesis[11] (self-birthing).

While the women category for Lesbians is accurate what occurs with this specific exclusion is how violence against lesbians in the former Yugoslavia and in the Balkan war and rape camps is excused and not held accountable.   It is a killing silence- a gynocide given a green light to this very day.

I do know that lesbian human geography before the war and during the war and in the aftermath is a continuous hell.  Yet, something did change in the aftermath of war when I and the Bosnian women war crimes and war survivors acknowledged that she exists along with a female social collective that committed to witness her life and their lives.  The killing silence is eliminated with the female solidarity and collective that allowed for witnessing her existence, her trauma while being in sisterhood.

Similar to the geographical extreme contrast between the Ahmica-Vitez, Novi Travnik to the mother town Travnik’s beauty, Travnik gives the impression of not being scarred or severely wounded from the century of wars. But the hidden truth are women’s suicides by flying off their dreary apartment buildings to their deaths.  This occurred in Novi Travnik-actually everywhere in the aftermath of the war.  The killing silence had their suicides classified as accidental.

At the very least, Novi Travnik’s ghetto like aftermath fits it’s an ugly munitions factory – a target during the Balkan War.  The ugly munitions factory is where Mersiha worked as an engineer.  Her human geography and environment are the backdrops of smudged soot colored apartment buildings before the war and after the war.  The buildings’ acne are the grenade impacts creating craters accompanied with millions of bullet holes that make no pattern- bullet holes are pitched in every direction.  The environment and backdrop of the buildings is why I never saw Mersiha standing near the building when she stormed into Sana’s photo shop.

I realized how the environment and human geography of hatred and violence camouflaged Mersiha physically and also spoke of how blindness is entrenched in the killing silence.

One half of the town is Muslim and the other half is Croatian.  Actually, the main street is the dividing line where Croat soldiers and snipers would lean out their windows and shoot at the Muslim population.  How she survived the snipers in the surrounding hillsides killing anyone attempting to go get food is unknown.  The Croatian side looks like another town in Eastern Europe- unscathed and plugged into the western world where funding and clean up was done in about 5 years.   Not so, for the Muslim side.  A cup of coffee on the Croatian side is about $2.00 but on the Muslim side 50 cents to a dollar[12].

Since the homosexuals are the preferred male gender it stands to reason that most lesbians and women are the hardest hit in the century of wars.   This is made possible with the governing entities and military to include the International criminal court for Yugoslavia tribunal[13].  The latter, blames the feminists for their advocacy of women’s sexual agency.   This did not stymie the use of public space and talk about the trauma endured by lesbians. Lepa Mladenovic, Serbian feminist activist wrote to Women in Black group Joan Nestle:

“From the beginning of wars in this region from ’91 I felt that I have to invent Ten thousand ways to let my lesbian desire breathe. At some moment during the last 8 years it was not easy for me to put in words how do I feel when making love with a woman and in the back there is a radio with the news of war. Killed, or expelled or other fascist acts. In my room, I would not be able to stand up from the bed, leave the desired bodies and switch off the news, also because I thought the respect to the killed I will show by not switching off the radio.”[14]

However, homosexuality was the door that opened to public awareness for the former Yugoslav provinces Croatia, Montenegro, Serbia and Slovenia in 1977.  According to Tajana Greif, an author (LL25- History of Slovenian Lesbian movement) and LGBTI activist reported ““It is only after that that homosexuality was able to enter public discourse and public space.”

Notice that Bosnia Hercegovina is not listed. The Balkan War genocide and gynocide to rape camps forms a denial narrative by not listing in the statistical women categories lesbians.   In fact, there is perhaps a shred of historical narratives or some witnessing that declares lesbians were targeted in the bloody war.

Lepa Mladenovic resisted the temptation to push away the news on the radio and to not fall into the killing silences.  Instead Lepa reconstitutes the lesbian desire to breathe and make love with a woman, a witnessing of her own trauma along with many lesbians in the radio broadcast that most likely did not cite lesbians.  What mattered was that Lepa knew from the concrete details that in the women category was the lesbian category.


Dr. Danica Borkovich Anderson founded and directed The Kolo: Women’s Cross Cultural Collaboration (The Kolo: WCCC) focusing on intersecting women’s collaboration, representation, and advocacy for social justice to halt violence against women internationally and nationally. The Kolo: WCCC promotes and provides women’s trauma counseling, treatment, and gives the opportunity to “train the trainer,” preparing lay persons to facilitate the ongoing work. The Kolo: WCCC presents a feminist perspective coupled with cross cultural practices that enable women in war torn regions, such as Africa (Sub-Sahara), Afghanistan, Bosnia, India, and Sri Lanka to become self-sustainable in their communities.


 

[1] Sexual heatmap- “But something proverbial hit the fan when the press release included the fact that there were early and consistent reports that antidepressants could change sexual orientation from homosexuality to heterosexuality. Impossible we were told. You will lose all credibility making these claims.

The first report of this effect is tucked away in the very first English language article on the discovery of the antidepressant effects of imipramine by Roland Kuhn. Imipramine we now know is a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Kuhn was a country doctor, more a psychotherapist than a psychopharmacologist. He was conservative in attitude. His explanation for what was going on was that some homosexual behaviors stemmed from depression and relieving this helped “normalize” other behaviors. He didn’t celebrate the issue but he may have been pleased – in line with dominant thinking at that time.” https://rxisk.org/the-sexual-heatmap-2/

[2] Saving Normal- “Saving Normal: An Insider’s Revolt Against Out-of-Control Psychiatric Diagnosis, DSM-5, Big Pharma, and the Medicalization of Ordinary Life as ‘part mea culpa, part j’accuse, part cri de coeur’.Frances’ arguments about the dangers of inflating psychiatric conditions and psychiatric diagnosis are persuasive – maybe more so because he honestly admits to his own role in developing such an inflation. He is keenly aware of the risks of diagnostic inflation ‘because of painful firsthand experience’, he writes. ‘Despite our efforts to tame excessive diagnostic exuberance, DSM-IV had since been misused to blow up the diagnostic bubble’. He is particularly concerned about the exponential increase in the diagnosis of psychiatric conditions in children, writing: ‘We failed to predict or prevent three new false epidemics of mental disorder in children – autismattention deficit, and childhood bipolar disorder. And we did nothing to contain the rampant diagnostic inflation that was already expanding the boundary of psychiatry far beyond its competence.’ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/reclaiming-childhood/201407/review-saving-normal-0

[3] “In ancient Rome, two men taking an oath of allegiance held each other’s testicles, and men held their own testicles as a sign of truthfulness while bearing witness in a public forum. The Romans found a word to describe this practice but didn’t invent the practice itself. Other primates had already been doing this for millions of years. Two male baboons who cooperate with each other by forming aggressive alliances against other baboons frequently fondle each other’s genitalia. This behavior has nothing to do with sex but it’s a social ritual that primatologists call a “greeting.” The behavior of ancient Romans and male baboons can be explained by the Handicap Principle, an evolutionary theory according to which the most effective way to obtain reliable information about a partner’s commitment in a relationship – whether a political alliance, a romantic relationship, or a business partnership – is to impose a cost on the partner and assess the partner’s willingness to pay it.” https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/games-primates-play/201112/testify-comes-the-latin-word-testicle

[4] I do want you to know that “Novi” translated from Bosnian means new in English.  The reason for naming it Novi Travnik is due to the mother town named Travnik located about five kilometers away.

[5] The Serbo-Croatian word kolo is very old and is most likely older than Sanskrit.  The kolo original meaning is the wheel and the Slavs call their round folk dances- kolo.  It also means to be in a circle.   I selected this word to evade the patriarchal symbols and return to the true meaning of the circle.

[6] The ethnic divides in former Yugoslavia: Croatians are Catholic, Serbians are Serbian Orthodox and Muslims are Bosniaks.

[7] The Ahmići massacre was the culmination of the Lašva Valley ethnic cleansing committed by the Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia’s political and military leadership on Bosniak civilians during the Croat-Bosniak War in April 1993

[8] “The seizure of Jajce appeared to confirm the Serbian leaders’ determination to press forward with their offensive, despite pledges to seek peace and to stop fighting for control of wide areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina where Serbs were a minority before the war. In Jajce and the surrounding county, Serbs accounted for 19 percent of the population of 45,000 people in the 1991 census, with Muslims accounting for 39 per cent and Croats 35 percent.

Muslims and Croats were among the refugees streaming into Travnik today down the only road not blocked by Serbian troops, a dirt track used by Jajce’s defenders to run supply convoys through the mountains at night. A BBC reporter said that the refugees were arriving in Travnik, 20 miles southeast of Jajce, covered in mud, wet from heavy rains, and limping with fatigue after spending most of two days on the trek. The reporter, Alan Little, said in a radio account that some refugees reported that Serbian fighters opened fire on the refugees from positions overlooking the road. https://www.nytimes.com/1992/10/31/world/30-mile-refugee-line-is-seen-in-bosnia.html

[9] Bosnia-Hercegovina continue the onslaught of omitting or excluding Lesbians- “Bosnia and Herzegovina Sarajevo Open Centre, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights organization, documented 23 cases of hate speech and incitement of violence and hate and two crimes and incidents motivated by prejudice on the basis of sexual orientation and/or gender identity in the first three months of 2016. The reaction of authorities to these incidents is generally inadequate. There was no progress in police investigations into the 2014 attack on a film festival that Sarajevo Open Centre organized.

In its annual progress on Bosnia and Herzegovina published in November, the European Commission highlighted the failure of authorities to amend the constitution, in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights and to implement rulings by the Constitutional Court. The report also identified inadequate legal protection for LGBTI persons and the failure of authorities to protect adequately the rights of minorities and to ensure media freedom.” https://www.hrw.org/news/2017/06/23/human-rights-watch-country-profiles-sexual-orientation-and-gender-identity.”

[10] Wendy Wheeler’s The Whole Creature Book-Wheeler argues that art and culture advance through intuited embodied knowledge. Tacit bodily knowledge- our genome and thousands of generations of ancestors’ lived experiences. https://books.google.com/books?id=LFDEK8QyNhkC&pg=PA102&lpg=PA102&dq=Wendy+Wheeler+tacit+knowledge+definition&source=bl&ots=DL4so92U3e&sig=ACfU3U1vLriIQlHrx0kcc6JIaOSVpSTlGw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwia-9ymgrrgAhXpr1QKHff9AWsQ6AEwAnoECAcQAQ#v=onepage&q=Wendy%20Wheeler%20tacit%20knowledge%20definition&f=false

[11] “It’s a theme as old as science fiction: A world without men. The story is a familiar one: lesbians living together in an all-women utopia, loving, raising families and their own food. No men are needed, even in the creation of children. There’s a word for creating children without men: parthenogenesis, but it’s never applied to humans. Parthenogenesis, or virgin birth, is defined as reproduction without fertilization. It occurs naturally in some plant and insect species. It does not occur naturally in mammals, but like many other procedures developed in modern medicine, it can now occur with the assistance of scientists.” https://www.liveabout.com/parthenogenesis-do-we-need-men-anymore-2170724

“The newspaper article unfortunately mentioned that such children would have to be daughters (it would have been interesting to see whether or not any sons were claimed, but, if so, they could not possibly be parthenoforms). Ultimately, 19 women presented themselves along with their daughters as examples of “virgin birth.” Eleven of these did not profess that no father existed, but were under the mistaken impression that the search was for a hymen intact after conception (but long since broken in birth). The remaining eight pairs were examined by Balfour-Lynn (1956), who blood typed mothers and daughters and found antigens present in six daughters that were absent in their mothers, clear evidence of genetic differences. In another pair, the mother had blue eyes and the daughter brown eyes, indicating genetic differences. In the single remaining case, “Mrs. Alpha and daughter,” there was apparent genetic identity in blood groups and several other genetically determined traits including electrophoretic analysis of serum. The probability of such a close match between a mother and daughter produced by heterosexual reproduction was less than one chance in a hundred (P < .01).” http://www.zo.utexas.edu/courses/thoc/virginbirth.pdf

[12] In my book Blood & Honey: The Secret Herstory- Balkan Women War Crimes and War Survivors, the narratives of Bosnian women war crimes and war survivors.

[13] Challenging Bosnian Women’s Identity as Rape Victims, as Unending Victims: The ‘Other’ Sex in Times of War “Still, while the ICTY‟s view of the use of rape in the Bosnian war was groundbreaking and lauded as a great success by many feminists, Engle argues that on some level the ICTY, influenced by feminist thinking, has inadvertently functioned to limit the narratives about women in war, denying much of women’s sexual and political agency (Engle, 2008, 942). Engle contends that many feminists treated at least some women as victims only, rather than as people capable of political and sexual agency during the war (Engle, 2005, 780). My research was prompted by the recognition that many important narratives of women’s agency in times of war have become silenced and ignored” https://vc.bridgew.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1027&context=jiws

[14] ibid

The hierarchy of Sexual assault: A gender non-conforming lesbian’s struggle for justice

by Pippa Fleming
daddigirlgriot.wordpress.com

I laid on a twin bed just inches off the ground weeping, “how the fuck did I get here?” as a hurricane hot flash and the smell of cat piss abruptly awakened me. Tears, sweat and funk permeated my sheets as I looked around the cluttered room feeling like a motherless child. As I rocked and held myself, I thought “death of a beloved and sexual assault feels the same.” First comes the shock and numbness, then come the people expressing empathetic sorrow and gestures of help. The body is laid to rest, then comes the repass with all that good soul food, while folks reminisce about the departed. When the last guest leaves, the door shutting behind them sparks the realization that you are alone and everyone else is going to get on with their lives, business as usual.

Call it intuition, a hunch or hindsight, I knew nothing was going to be done. I am a black gender non-conforming lesbian. Even with a narcissistic apology email from my perpetrator (that I’m going to share for shit’s and giggles) what could a black butch lesbian expect? I was disposable, nor was I a famous “queer” woman with a powerful platform like Ellen DeGeneres or Roxane Gay, sharing their stories of sexual assault… nor was I the wife of a famous basketball player like Steph Curry, who had a man arrested after making lewd comments about sexually assaulting her.

Continue reading: The hierarchy of Sexual assault: A gender non-conforming lesbian’s struggle for justice (source)

France: Women call out sexism and lesbophobia in the LGBTI movement

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Eight women are calling for an end to sexism in the LGBT community

“We are women, committed, committed to the rights, freedoms and visibility of LGBT +, especially women and lesbians, in France and Europe. For some of us, we are or have been the first women Presidents and / or spokespersons, activists involved in LGBT + organizations.We wish by this tribune to share a flush. Fed up with the ordinary sexism and misogyny of the LGBT community, as much as in our society in general. To be a woman in the LGBT community is to be faced with a double sentence. Far from us the idea of prioritizing minorities, but it is clear that our dual discrimination, woman and homosexual, does not really seem to be integrated by a number of gays, despite some speeches facade!

Women excluded from decisions
In our struggle for the rights of LGBT people, there is now a need to defend our rights as women within our community.

Refused by a physio because “too feminine” (sic), resignation of members “not wanting to be led by a woman” (re sic), bullying, speech cut, gritty jokes, we all witnessed or experienced breathtaking scenes reminding us that beyond being gay, you are men first and foremost.

As women emancipate themselves, the world seems to be aware and the extent of the phenomenon “me too”, the gay community has not, as a whole, questioned the virilist behaviors of machismo and greed power and recognition. In this sense it reproduces the conscious or unconscious behaviors of its heterosexual counterparts. It is a combination of self-esteem and endogamy, with gay activists finding themselves in their leisure and outing areas, sometimes after our meetings as well, which maintains a male fraternity, effectively excluding women from many decisions. .

Lesbians are not your enemies
Gentlemen, do not be fooled by fights, lesbians are not your enemies. Know how to make room, and for that know to even stay in your place.

For example, we are thinking of the debate on extending the PMA to all women. How many lesbians, how many people, in the media, in political meetings and hearings to talk about our pregnancies, our bodies, our families? Very, very little!
How do you think you can speak, sometimes in a contradictory way, in place of the women concerned, whose aspirations may be different and only legitimate to bring all the nuances?

In general, how are too many gay people engaged in discussions, meetings, boards of directors of LGBT associations? By monopolizing speech, sometimes by repeating words spoken by women to rephrase them, under the approval of other gays present. Many reproduce the sexist behaviors, a legacy of the education received where the man is always valued and pushed forward by the family environment and the social environment.

This statement shared by the associations that fight against inequality between women and men and sexism is ours and must be yours, acting as the founders of #jamaissanselles have been able to do.

The issue of under-representation of lesbians in the governance of mixed LGBT + associations for a number of reasons must lead CAs to question the causes and how to respond to them. ”

Catherine MICHAUD – Catherine TRIPON – Aurélie NICOLAS – Marie-Claude PICARDAT – Emmanuelle CAMPO – Emilie DURET – Flora BOLTER – Aurore FOURSY

(Translated)
Huit femmes lancent un appel pour mettre fin au sexisme au sein de la communauté LGBT

 

Nous sommes des femmes, engagées, impliquées pour les droits, les libertés et la visibilité des LGBT+, particulièrement des femmes et des lesbiennes, en France et en Europe. Pour certaines d’entre nous, nous sommes ou avons été les premières femmes présidentes et/ou porte-paroles, militantes engagées au sein d’organismes LGBT+.

Nous souhaitons par cette tribune faire part d’un ras le bol. Le ras le bol du sexisme et de la misogynie ordinaires régnant dans le milieu LGBT, autant que dans notre société en général. Être une femme dans le milieu LGBT c’est être confrontée à une double peine. Loin de nous l’idée de hiérarchiser les minorités mais force est de constater que notre double discrimination, femme et homosexuelle, ne semble pas véritablement être intégrée par un certain nombre de gays, malgré quelques discours de façade !

Les femmes exclues des décisions
A notre combat pour les droits des personnes LGBT s’ajoute aujourd’hui le besoin de défendre nos droits comme femmes au sein même de notre communauté.

Refoulées par un physio car « trop féminines » (sic), démission d’adhérents « ne voulant pas être dirigés par une femme » (re sic), brimades, paroles coupées, blagues graveleuses, nous avons toutes assisté à ou vécu des scènes ahurissantes nous rappelant qu’au-delà d’être gays vous êtes des hommes avant tout.

Alors que les femmes s’émancipent, que le monde semble prendre conscience et la mesure du phénomène « me too », la communauté gay n’a pas, dans son ensemble, remis en question les comportements virilistes du machisme et de l’avidité du pouvoir et de reconnaissance. En ce sens elle reproduit les comportements conscients ou inconscients de ses homologues hétérosexuels. Cela se double d’un entre soi et d’une endogamie, les militants gays se retrouvant dans leurs espaces de loisirs et de sortie, parfois aussi après nos réunions, ce qui entretient une fraternité masculine, excluant de fait les femmes de nombres de décisions.

Les lesbiennes ne sont pas vos ennemies
Messieurs, ne vous trompez pas de combats, les lesbiennes ne sont pas vos ennemies. Sachez faire de la place, et pour cela sachez même rester à votre place.

Nous pensons par exemple au débat sur l’extension de la PMA à toutes les femmes. Combien de lesbiennes, combien de personnes concernées, dans les médias, dans des réunions et auditions politiques pour parler de nos grossesses, de nos corps, de nos familles ? Très, trop peu !
Comment pensez-vous pouvoir parler, parfois de manière contradictoire, à la place des femmes concernées, dont les aspirations peuvent être différentes et sont seules légitimes pour en apporter toutes les nuances ?

De manière générale comment se comportent trop de gays dans le cadre de discussions, réunions, conseils d’administration d’associations LGBT ? En monopolisant la parole, parfois en reprenant des propos énoncés par des femmes pour les reformuler, sous l’approbation d’autres gays présents. Beaucoup reproduisent les comportements sexistes, héritage de l’éducation reçue où l’homme est toujours valorisé et poussé en avant par l’entourage familial et l’environnement social.

Ce constat partagé par les associations qui luttent contre l’inégalité entre les femmes et les hommes et le sexisme est le nôtre et doit être le vôtre, en agissant comme les fondateurs de #jamaissanselles ont su le faire.

La question de la sous-représentation des lesbiennes dans la gouvernance des associations mixtes LGBT+ pour plusieurs raisons doit amener les CA à s’interroger sur les causes et la manière d’y répondre. »

Catherine MICHAUD – Catherine TRIPON – Aurélie NICOLAS – Marie-Claude PICARDAT – Emmanuelle CAMPO – Emilie DURET – Flora BOLTER – Aurore FOURSY

(original)

(LVD) U.S: Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution

by Amy Dyess

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The lesbian liberation movement is rising. We’re grassroots, and that’s something the elitist, powerful “LGBTQ+” organizations and media can’t buy. That’s why they’re scared of us and why they’re doubling down on their lesbophobic attacks, even for the Lesbian Day of Visibility.
Rebellion and disobedience can come in various forms. It could mean suing your high school or university over anti-lesbian or anti-female discrimination. It could mean creating more art and expanding lesbian culture, as well as organizing group meetings.
Support lesbians by amplifying the hard work women are doing. If you can’t donate to a lesbian’s project then you can still promote and find ways to get involved. Or, start your own project. We need to strengthen the resources we have left while creating new ones to replace those that failed us.
I’m working on an entire album of new music, including a rock ballad tribute to Stormé DeLarverie. A lesbian news and culture site and channel are also on the horizon, and I could use sponsors to help with that, as well as a drama TV series I’m developing about lesbians in the movement.
Whether you’re down on your luck or thriving, I hope “Get the L Out” inspires and energizes you. The lesbian community needs your help, your energy. Stormé had big dyke energy in her era. Now it’s time to make your mark. Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution!

Continue reading: https://medium.com/@amydyess83
/welcome-to-the-lesbian-revolution-7c96e6989805
(status)

(LVD) What it’s like to grow up a lesbian in Saudi Arabia

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In Saudi Arabia, homosexuality is a crime punishable by death. Forget about gay marriage. Gay rights are virtually non-existent, so most LGBT Arabs lead deeply closeted lives.
We’re using AJ’s initials because not everyone in her family knows that she’s a lesbian. If 34-year-old AJ could go back in time and tell her 17-year-old self that she’d stop wearing hijab, own a car and have a girlfriend one day, she says her younger self would have never believed it.
“My mom was very strict,” AJ says. “I really couldn’t go out with friends, couldn’t leave the house or visit friends, or do anything.”
But even while living under her mother’s thumb, AJ began to realize she was different.
“I always had a crush on women,” she says.
“Another fun fact about Saudi — it’s very normal for females to have a crush on another female,” she says. “But then when it became more sexual, that’s where you drew the line.”
AJ had no one to talk with about what she was feeling, so she went online.
“I took to Google, looked up my symptoms. Google tells me I’m gay. And I’m like, ‘oh no I’m not.’”
Her reluctance to accept it wasn’t because she grew up Muslim — she says she was never a believer, despite coming from a religiously conservative home. She didn’t want to be gay because it’s nearly impossible to lead an open, honest life in Saudi as a queer person.

Continue reading: https://www.pri.org/stories/2015-07-22/what-its-grow-lesbian-saudi-arabia (source)

(LVD) China: being a ‘kick’ in a gendered society

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“I tried on men’s clothing in the fitting room of the women’s department, because the clerk in front of the fitting room on the second floor said: “Girls can’t come in the men’s fitting room, please go downstairs.” The shirt hem is too narrow, the t-shirt is too long, the trousers are too long, the pants are going to roll. I am not fat but I hate the curve of fat in the body, they make me look like a ‘girl’. The button on my chest couldn’t be buckled. I put back my original clothes and walked out of the fitting room. The sweater on my body was peeled off. “Men’s Wear” makes me embrace my pride as a lesbian and queer, but the lack of media representation, the lack of diversity in the clothing industry, and the strong division of gender in the menswear sector remind me all the time: You don’t belong here, this is the sex/uality disposition you can’t have.
(Translated)

我在女裝部門的試衣間裡試穿男裝,因為剛剛二樓試衣間前的店員說:「女生不能進來男裝試衣間,請你到樓下。」襯衫下擺太窄、T-shirt太長、長褲褲襠太長、褲管要捲,我是不是又胖了,我討厭脂肪在身上造成的曲線,它們讓我顯得好像「女生」。我胸口的扣子扣不起來,我穿回原本的衣服快步走出試衣間,我身上的那件毛衣被剝了下來。「男裝」讓我擁抱我身為女同志、酷兒的驕傲,但是媒體代表性的缺乏、服裝產業對多元身材包容性的不足、男裝部門性別二元的強烈分野,時時刻刻提醒我:你不屬於這裡,這是你拿不起的性別氣質。
(Original)
Continue reading at: https://hk.thenewslens.com/article/116780 (Source)

(LVD) Brazil: “We lesbians are still fetishized on the streets and in the media”

Often seen by society through the lens of hatred or fetish, lesbian women seek visibility amid political crisis, loss of rights and the conservative wave.
“We continue to be fetishized on the streets and in the media and our sexuality continues to be infantilized and trivialized, since patriarchal society only believes in the heteronormative model of relationship and affection. Such a model legitimizes harassment, violence and our total invisibility, thus putting our lives at risk at all times,” explains Natalia Pinheiro, 27.
In the Americas, violence against lesbians is driven mainly by misogyny and gender inequality, as historically noted in the reports on the subject produced by the Organization of American States (OAS). Among the recorded violence are “corrective rape”, that is, sexual violence aimed at “changing” the sexual orientation of the victim, aggression due to public displays of affection and forced hospitalizations aimed at “converting” the sexual orientation of the victims.
Pinheiro was one of the organizers, along with her companion Bru Isumavut, of the Dyke Fest, a feminist lesbian festival that brought together bands and promoted discussions in São Paulo on Sunday 27, about the prejudices that affect this population.
(Translated)

Em geral vistas pela sociedade por meio das lentes do ódio ou do fetiche, as mulheres lésbicas buscam visibilidade em meio à crise política, à perda de direitos e à onda conservadora.
“Seguimos fetichizadas nas ruas e na mídia e a nossa sexualidade segue sendo infantilizada e banalizada, uma vez que a sociedade patriarcal só acredita no modelo heteronormativo de relação e afeto. Tal modelo legitima assédios, violências e a nossa total invisibilização, colocando, desta forma, nossas vidas em risco a todo momento”, explica Natalia Pinheiro, 27 anos.
No continente americano, a violência contra lésbicas é movida principalmente pela misoginia e a desigualdade de gênero, como constatado historicamente nos relatórios sobre o tema produzidos pela Organização dos Estados Americanos (OEA). Entre as violências registradas estão o “estupro corretivo”, isto é, a violência sexual que objetiva “mudar” a orientação sexual da vítima, agressões devido a demonstrações públicas de afeto e internações forçadas visando “converter” a orientação sexual das vítimas.
Publicitária e produtora cultural, Pinheiro foi uma das organizadoras, ao lado de sua companheira Bru Isumavut, do Dyke Fest, festival lésbico feminista que reuniu bandas e promoveu discussões em São Paulo, no domingo 27, sobre os preconceitos que atingem essa população.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.cartacapital.com.br/
diversidade/nos-lesbicas-seguimos-fetichizadas-nas-ruas-e-na-midia/
(source)

(LVD) They are a lesbian Jewish-Palestinian couple. Here’s how they are using comedy to confront stereotypes

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The El Salomons pose to their audience a joint face of ultimate resistance. Their journey — whether with coming out, marrying someone from a different religion or working in an industry that is traditionally unkind to women — will likely continue to face hecklers along the way, but for now, the two are looking to take over the New York comedy scene one uncomfortable joke at a time.

Continue reading: https://www.thelily.com/they-are-a-lesbian-jewish-palestinian-couple-heres-how-they-are-using-comedy-to-confront-stereotypes/ (source)

 

(LVD) Nepal: An inspiring story about a lesbian activist

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Apeksha Dahal (24), a young and open lesbian has been working for more than seven years in the LGBTI movement. Dahal is associated with Blue Diamond Society. Initially rejected by family, restricted in school, forced to get married to a man, Apeksha started her journey as an activist from Makwanpur to Kathmandu.

Continue reading: http://pahichan.com/an-inspiring-story-about-a-lesbian-activist/ (source)

 

(LVD) Jolanta Ogar’s story of coming out as a Polish lesbian

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Jola [Ogar-Hill] is a titled sailor, she was a world and European champion. She has a wife, she is happy. She came out  when she was 21 years old. “One evening I asked my mother for peace”. I said, “I’m in love, but this person is a woman. She remembers her coming out. “Mama was scared, she got scared for her own child.” 15 years have passed, Jola continues to sail and counts on Poland to finally change. “There are a lot of people in Polish sport who are afraid to come out,” she admits.
(Translated)

Jola jest utytułowaną żeglarką, była mistrzynią świata i Europy. Ma żonę, jest szczęśliwa. Ujawniła się, gdy miała 21 lat. – Pewnego wieczoru poprosiłam mamę do pokoju. Powiedziałam: jestem zakochana, ale ta osoba jest kobietą – wspomina swój coming out. Mama się przeraziła, wystraszyła o własne dziecko. Minęło 15 lat, Jola dalej żegluje i liczy, że Polska w końcu się zmieni. – W polskim sporcie jest mnóstwo osób, które boją się ujawnić – przyznaje.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.tvn24.pl/magazyn-tvn24/jolanta-ogar-kolezance-mowie-zeby-nie-pila-z-tej-samej-butelki-bo-bedzie-lesbijka,204,3557 (source)

(LVD) Cuba: Sports event – “Tortiolimpiadas” – gives lesbians visibility

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“We came to this park frequently. A friend, Leire Fernández, came up with the idea of ​​taking advantage of the visits to Monte Barreto to make some games, which she named Tortiolimpiadas, “explained Lidia Romero, a worker at Clandestina, a private enterprise that celebrates its fourth anniversary.
In Cuba, the term tortillera is used to disparately name lesbian women and its use is widespread.
(Translated)

“Veníamos frecuentemente a este parque. A una amiga, Leire Fernández, se le ocurrió la idea de aprovechar las visitas a Monte Barreto para hacer unos juegos, que nombró las Tortiolimpiadas”, explicó Lidia Romero, trabajadora de Clandestina, un emprendimiento privado que celebra su cuarto aniversario.
En Cuba, el término tortillera se emplea para nombrar despectivamente a las mujeres lesbianas y su uso está muy extendido.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.ipscuba.net/genero/tope-deportivo-visibiliza-a-lesbianas-de-cuba/ (source)

(LVD) U.S: Photos of Lesbian Lives Meant to Inspire a Movement

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Joan E. Biren began to photograph at a time when it was almost impossible to find authentic images of lesbians and aimed to help build a movement for their liberation.

“I started photographing at a time when it was almost impossible to find authentic images of lesbians,” she said. “I wanted my photographs to be seen: I believed they could help build a movement for our liberation.”

JEB was inspired by two friends who were also mentors. “I watched them, and I read what they wrote, and I translated it into visuals that I needed to share as widely as possible,” she recalled. “Barbara Deming taught me to be still and to listen. Audre Lorde taught me to be active and to speak out.”

Continue reading: https://www.nytimes.com/2019
/04/08/lens/lesbian-lives-movement-jeb.html
(source)

(LVD) Living as a Lesbian in Iran, Where Being Gay Is Illegal


In Iran, being gay can carry a death sentence for men. Though lesbians are discussed less frequently, they too face severe government-sanctioned punishment, including lashes and flogging.
The three days Azadeh* spent in interrogation felt to her like months.
In a remote villa on the outskirts of Iran, she sat listening to clergymen preaching quotes from the Quran as the burns on her arms stung with infection.
Growing up, the 25-year-old says she was often bullied for her “boyish” looks. But several years ago, the harassment took on a more sinister form when she was arrested and tortured by Iranian Revolutionary Guards. The guards had found a short story by Azadeh about two male soldiers who were lovers during the war, after a tip-off from a girl Azadeh says held a personal grudge against her.
“I never directly used the word ‘homosexuality’ in my writings,” Azadeh says, “but they wanted to use those writings to get a confession from me that I’m a lesbian. I denied everything.”
Regardless, she was forced to undergo a three-day long “reorientation course”, which she quickly learnt was a euphemism for interrogation. It consisted, she says, of religious instruction and repeated attempts to force her to admit she was gay.
“They tortured me by pouring boiling water on my skin and beating me, especially on the head. [But] more than physical torture, I was subjected to verbal abuse,” she says. “They kept telling me that I was a ‘pussy licker’.”

Azadeh doesn’t see any contradiction between her religious beliefs and her sexual orientation. Her own (legally unofficial) marriage to a woman followed Muslim marriage rituals, and she considers her partner to be her wife in accordance with religious rules. “I used to struggle a lot to interpret the Quran in a way that was more compatible with my situation as a lesbian,” she says. “I think we need new fatwa for this issue.”

Continue reading: https://broadly.vice.com/
en_us/article/a3wvjk/living-as-a-lesbian-in-iran-where-being-gay-is-illegal
(source)

(LVD) Chile: 300 Lesbians Marching

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On March 8 in Chile was a historic day in every way, it was one of the most popular marches in our history, around 350,000 women in Santiago de Chile marching together, 800,000 throughout the country, in unison, protesting and commemorating proudly the day of the working woman. Never a march called by women had achieved such a call and for more than 30 years in Chile did not see such a massive march.
This march full of women, of all women, managed to make us all mobilize, to go out and meet thousands of compañeras who, although we did not know, we returned with every step, with every cry, with every knowing glance, our sisters.
Among all those women, of all the groups and of all the blocks in which the march was divided, one stood out full of vigor, strength and struggle. Lesbians marched together, lesbians from groups, self-convened lesbians, all marched, became visible and present. The articulator “Redlesbofeminista” called months before to play it in this historic battle and something that became impossible was taking shape.
(Translated)

El día 8 de Marzo en Chile fue un día histórico en todo sentido, fue una de las marchas mas concurridas en toda nuestra historia, alrededor de 350.000 mujeres en Santiago de Chile marchando juntas, 800.000 en todo el país, al unísono, protestando y conmemorando con orgullo el día de la mujer trabajadora. Nunca una marcha convocada por mujeres había logrado tal convocatoria y desde hace más de 30 años en Chile no se veía una marcha tan masiva.
Esta marcha llena de mujeres, de todas las mujeres, logró hacer que todas nos movilizáramos, que saliéramos y nos encontráramos con miles de compañeras que aunque no conocíamos volvíamos con cada paso, con cada grito, con cada mirada cómplice, nuestras hermanas.
Dentro de todas esas mujeres, de todas las agrupaciones y de todos los bloques en los que se dividía la marcha, uno resaltaba lleno de vigor, fuerza y lucha. Las lesbianas marchaban juntas, lesbianas de agrupaciones, lesbianas autoconvocadas, todas marchaban, se hacían visibles y presentes. La articuladora “Redlesbofeminista”, convocó meses antes a jugárnosla en esta histórica batalla y algo que se hacía imposible fue tomando forma.
(Original)

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Continue reading: https://www.eldesconcierto.cl/2019
/03/15/las-300-lesbianas-marchando/
(source)

(LVD) Toward a Black Lesbian Jurisprudence

by Theresa Raffaele Jefferson

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Black lesbians are everywhere and nowhere all at once. Throughout history we have been made invisible. This invisibility serves as a constant reminder that our culture, and indeed our very lives are considered at best illegitimate. At the same time, our identity as Black lesbians has been made hyper-visible when we have tried to remain in the wings. In these instances hyper-visibility becomes a means of punishment-a penalty for not understanding or refusing to abide by societal mandates. The experiences of Black lesbians in law and society illustrate this seeming invisibility/hyper-visibility paradox. Yet the tools of invisibility and hyper-visibility serve the same purpose-the legitimation of dominant cultural control. Invisibility and hyper-visibility compliment each other. They act in concert, as a dual cultural strategy of distortion, suppression, and punishment. A consistent Black lesbian jurisprudence has emerged whereby Black lesbians and our rights are erased at the intersection of our race, gender, and sexual orientation. This Note is an attempt to explore the lives of Black lesbians, to uncover law and society’s desire for us to remain seen or unseen depending on the context, and to provide a starting point for others to conduct future research.

Continue reading: https://racism.org/articles/
intersectionality/sexual-orientation/2616-toward-a-black-lesbian
(source)

(LVD) Spain: “We feel more secure in the town than in the city”

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A recent investigation conducted by the professor of the University of Cantabria Noelia Fernández-Rouco in which three other teachers have collaborated has analyzed the satisfaction of lesbian women in the Spanish rural environment, pointing out the main difficulty they face: the obstacles to find mutual support networks in these communities. “There are issues with a more particular character, which have to do mainly with access to resources, with distance or anonymity, although it sounds contradictory, “explains the author. “When the stigma is very present, it is what people seek, and for that they move from their places of origin or need them to present sufficient resources to form these networks or facilitate the possibility of meeting people.”
(Translated)

Una reciente investigación dirigida por la profesora de la Universidad de Cantabria Noelia Fernández-Rouco en la que han colaborado otros tres profesores ha analizado la satisfacción de las mujeres lesbianas del entorno rural español, señalando la principal dificultad a la que deben enfrentarse: las trabas para encontrar redes de apoyo mutuo en estas comunidades. “Hay cuestiones con un carácter más particular, que tienen que ver sobre todo con el acceso a recursos, con la distancia o el anonimato, aunque suene contradictorio”, explica a este medio la autora. “Cuando el estigma está muy presente, es lo que buscan las personas, y para eso se desplazan de sus lugares de origen o necesitan que estos presenten recursos suficientes que permitan formar estas redes o faciliten la posibilidad de conocer gente”.
(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.elconfidencial.com/alma-corazon-vida/2019-04-12/lesbiana-espana-rural-beso-novia_1938214/ (source)

 

(LVD) Australia: Thanks To Lesbian Stand-Up Hannah Gadsby We Are FINALLY Seen

By Julia Diana Robertson

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Hannah Gadsby, a suit-rocking lesbian, just put out a Netflix stand-up special, and you MUST go watch it now. As a matter of fact, anyone who cares at all about a lesbian, needs to watch it now. I’d go so far as to say, it should be mandatory. It’s groundbreaking. Unprecedented. Monumental. Certainly one of the best things I’ve ever seen. I laughed (a lot) & cried. And I don’t cry easily. I’m a tough nut to crack—been shot at, seen b*mbs, and my tears are typically relegated to the privacy of a locked bathroom—So lesbians, when I say something powerful went down, I mean something powerful went down. Plus, added bonus, she uses the word lesbian about 100 times.

Gadsby wants her audience to feel the tension because they should know, if only briefly, the tension that women like her feel “all the time.”  Because of this dangerous attitude—‘If you want to look like a man, I’ll beat you like a man’—has been upheld, while the world carries on around us. In 2018, while rule-breaking lesbians are still relegated to a punchline, the mainstream will currently feature— with dignity and style—anyone, whether L, G, B, or T, so long as they adhere to the ‘rules’ of ‘gender’. Gadsby poignantly saysIf I’d been ‘feminine’, that would not have happened. I am ‘incorrectly’ female.” And that’s what the media tells us every single day of our lives… we are “‘incorrectly’ female.”

But despite her anger, depression and #metoo stories, she doesn’t want to be seen as a victim. “There is nothing stronger than a broken woman who has rebuilt herself,” she says valiantly. And I agree. Gadsby is now added to a proud history of suit-wearing lesbian warriors—And those warriors are often the best that womanhood has to offer.

WE ARE NOT A PUNCHLINE. Thanks to Gadsby, our voice FINALLY broke into the mainstream. And IT’S ABOUT. F*CKING. TIME.

Continue reading: https://www.afterellen.com/general-news/560969-thanks-to-lesbian-stand-up-hannah-gadsby-we-were-finally-seen-and-its-about-fcking-time (source)