Tag Archives: lesbian resistance

Mexico: Lesbians, women in resistance

Love doesn't hurt hate does

Photo: Mario Jiménez Leyva

Vilma Katt Ulloa, lesbofeminist activist, argues that the fight against discrimination based on sexual preference, in Mexico was led by women. Thus, the names of lesbians such as María Castro, Nancy Cárdenas and Alma Margarita Oceguera are inscribed in the story. Over the years, the movement for the vindication of their rights was aimed at making women again invisible under the predominance of machismo and the misogyny also present within the gay community. “There is an internalized lesbophobia that is lived within those letters with which the non-heterosexual population has been characterized.”
(Translated)

Vilma Katt Ulloa, activista lesbofeminista, sostiene que la lucha contra la discriminación por preferencia sexual, en México fueron encabezada por mujeres. Así, dentro de la historia están inscritos los nombres de lesbianas como María Castro, Nancy Cárdenas y Alma Margarita Oceguera. Al paso de los años, el movimiento por la reivindicación de sus derechos fue enfilado a invisibilizar nuevamente a las mujeres bajo la predominación del machismo y la misoginia presente también dentro de la comunidad gay. “Hay una lesbofobia interiorizada la que se vive dentro de esas letras con las que se ha caracterizado a la población no heterosexual”.

Continue reading at: https://www.nvinoticias.com/nota/120109/lesbianas-mujeres-en-resistencia(Source)

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Brazil: The lesbian activist who defends LGBT rights in the Amazon

dani-lesbiana-indigena

Dani is the indigenous woman who stars in the second chapter of ‘Rainforest Defenders’ and one of the leaders, at only 21 years old, of the Amazonian resistance to the logging, mining and agrarian threat. But Dani is something else. She is one of the first indigenous women to say openly that she is a lesbian and use her visibility to fight for the LGTB cause in the Amazon.

She belongs to one of the communities that live on the banks of the Tapajós River, a mixture of ancient native settlers, indigenous people, descendants of African slaves and whites of Portuguese origin. Communities that are trying to avoid the exploitation and destruction of their land.

Dani’s community has an advantage over the majority, as it is considered [in] a Conservation Reserve, and therefore temporarily protected from indiscriminate extraction. But the young woman still has to fight against the threats that the extensive cultivation of soy exerts on her land and also against the prejudices of her own community, of the evangelist church, religion they profess, and of her own family .(Translated)

Dani es la indígena que protagoniza el capítulo segundo de ‘Rainforest Defenders’ y una de las líderes, a sus solo 21 años, de la resistencia amazónica frente a la amenaza maderera, minera y agraria. Pero Dani es algo más. Es una de las primeras indígenas en decir abiertamente que es lesbiana y usar su visibilidad para luchar por la causa LGTB en la Amazonia.

Pertenece a una de las comunidades que viven a la vera del río Tapajós, mezcla de antiguos pobladores autóctonos, indígenas, descendientes de esclavos africanos y blancos de origen portugués. Comunidades que están tratando evitar la explotación y destrucción de su tierra.

La comunidad de Dani tiene cierta ventaja frente a la mayoría, pues está considerada como una Reserva de Conservación, y por tanto, protegida temporalmente de la extracción indiscriminada. Pero la joven sigue teniendo que luchar contra las amenazas que el cultivo extensivo de soja ejerce sobre su tierra y también contra los prejuicios de su propia comunidad, de la iglesia evangelista, religión que profesan, y de su propia familia.
(Original)

Continue reading at: http://www.mirales.es/dani-la-indigena-lesbiana-que-defiende-los-derechos-lgtb-en-la-amazonia/ (Source)

(LVD) U.S: Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution

by Amy Dyess

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The lesbian liberation movement is rising. We’re grassroots, and that’s something the elitist, powerful “LGBTQ+” organizations and media can’t buy. That’s why they’re scared of us and why they’re doubling down on their lesbophobic attacks, even for the Lesbian Day of Visibility.
Rebellion and disobedience can come in various forms. It could mean suing your high school or university over anti-lesbian or anti-female discrimination. It could mean creating more art and expanding lesbian culture, as well as organizing group meetings.
Support lesbians by amplifying the hard work women are doing. If you can’t donate to a lesbian’s project then you can still promote and find ways to get involved. Or, start your own project. We need to strengthen the resources we have left while creating new ones to replace those that failed us.
I’m working on an entire album of new music, including a rock ballad tribute to Stormé DeLarverie. A lesbian news and culture site and channel are also on the horizon, and I could use sponsors to help with that, as well as a drama TV series I’m developing about lesbians in the movement.
Whether you’re down on your luck or thriving, I hope “Get the L Out” inspires and energizes you. The lesbian community needs your help, your energy. Stormé had big dyke energy in her era. Now it’s time to make your mark. Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution!

Continue reading: https://medium.com/@amydyess83
/welcome-to-the-lesbian-revolution-7c96e6989805
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Lesbian Visibility Day 2019 (LVD)

By Liz Waterhouse

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, lesbian visibility in even the most lesbian friendly nations is under threat both from traditional sources, and within communities that purport to support us.

We see this evidenced by representation in LGBTI organisation reports and funding:

Data source: Source: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sfos0060/LGBT_figures.shtml

We also see a decrease in lesbians who feel comfortable naming themselves as such,  under pressure from both a lesbophobic society and a male dominated community, neither of which support female-focused women.

Female-only same sex attraction has faced centuries of opposition as an “immoral” practise, and that opposition has been embraced and reframed lesbianism as exclusionary and bigoted.

Even within media from our own community it is difficult to source information on the global experiences of lesbians, although the lesbians of the world face double oppression as women and homosexuals.

Furthermore we see an ongoing war waged against women who do not demonstrate femininity or comply with the female sex role, with women continuing to be encouraged to see gender non conformity or gender resistance as evidence of masculinity.

And while lesbian visibility is under threat, the concrete situation for lesbians around the world remains dire. The world remains male dominated, with female exploitation underpinning social structures.  The situation is exacerbated by widespread and powerful religious opposition, vestiges of colonial homophobia, brutal racism and the rise in sharply right wing politics in many countries and regions.

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, as always, Listening2Lesbians focuses on lesbians, lesbian experiences and lesbian resistance around the world.

We ask you to support lesbians and do the same.

Liz and Ari, Listening2Lesbians

Black Lesbian Resistance and Resilience: Sheila Alexander-Reid

Women in the Life 1994

Women in the Life Magazine in its second year of publication in 1994.

“In 1992, I started Women in the Life, Inc., an events management company that created safe spaces for Black lesbians to interact through dance parties, concerts, fundraisers, and open mic poetry sessions in over 50 locations in Washington, D.C. alone, not to mention Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Atlanta. Some of the many artists featured at Women in the Life events included Grace JonesC+C Music FactoryCeCe PenistonMeshell Ndegecocello, R. Erica DoyleSamiya A. BashirKarma Mayet JohnsonPamela SneedMichelle ParkersonVenus ThrashMichaela HarrisonBarbara Tucker, ONYX, and Staceyann Chinn. Over a ten-year period, with the help of friends Charlene Hamilton, Darlene Rogers, Chris Vera, Lois Alexander, the late Phyllis Croom and so many more, I published a total of 86 issues of Women in the Life Magazine, which addressed issues that impacted our community both in Washington, D.C., throughout the United States, and internationally. The magazine was distributed nationally.

Continue reading at: https://thefeministwire.com/2019/02/black-lesbian-resistance-and-resilience/

USA: Lesbian waitress speaks out against hate – I’m not a f@g, I’m a dyke

Michele Crider

I’m not a f@g, I’m a dyke: Michele Crider speaks to the customers who refused to tip her and said “I don’t tip f@gs”

Michele Crider said she was working a lunch shift on Tuesday at the Dash-In restaurant in Fort Wayne, where she has worked for almost a year, when she was assigned a table occupied by two men “who were not that nice.”

Eight years in the service industry have taught her to recognize when customers seem to want their space, she told NBC News in a phone interview Thursday. That seemed to be the case with the two men at this table.

But when Crider, who is gay, went to pick up the check after the men left, she found: “I don’t tip f—,” written on it.

Continue reading at: https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/indiana-waitress-viral-video-addresses-customer-who-wrote-gay-slur-n974191 (Source)