Tag Archives: lesbian resistance

International Lesbian Day: Tribute to Barbara Hammer – “History Lessons” and the History of Cinema

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On the 16th [of March], at the tender age of 79, the world lost Barbara Hammer, one of the most important American filmmakers of the last century. If at the beginning of her career her work was seen as marginal, the same cannot be said about today. Over time, recognition of her work has grown and evidence of her current status of reference is her participation in the films Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor (2018) by Lynne Sachs and Vever (2018), a curious triangulation of Hammer’s works, Maya Deren and Deborah Stratman, both being perfect illustrations of her influence on the generations of filmmakers who followed her. Barbara Hammer was one of the first and most prominent voices to actively bring lesbianism to the movies with films like Dyketactics.(1974) or Sisters! (1974), thus changing the history of cinema to places where she had rarely been. The undervaluation of this filmmaker’s work, confining its relevance to the falsely separated universe of queer cinema does not do her justice; if anything, the cultural balkanization that this attitude shows – it is a discreet counterpart of the buzzword “I have nothing against homosexuals as long as it is not in front of me!” – tells us how their struggle persists.

Hammer herself realized the need to rewrite history to accommodate the perspectives of identity groups hitherto neglected by male, white, and heterosexual dominance, and put this rewriting into practice in her 2000 feature film, History Lessons . Consisting almost entirely of archival images, the film aims to attack the narrative that has always and, in the case of cinema, since its invention, tried to hide lesbianism from the public eye, refocusing the images to focus on these women’s perspective – paraphrasing Hannah Gadsby in Nanette, Picasso was not enough to open the culture to other perspectives. The anachronism of image organization, which mixes everything from 1940s magazines to 1960s pornographic films, reveals a stagnant condemnation of lesbians and women in general. However, History Lessons is equally celebratory of each moment of emancipation and even shows some sense of humor.

(Translated)

No passado dia 16, à tenra idade de 79 anos, o mundo perdeu Barbara Hammer, uma das mais importantes cineastas norte-americanas do século passado. Se no começo da sua carreira a sua obra era vista como marginal, o mesmo não pode ser dito sobre os dias de hoje. Com o tempo, o reconhecimento da sua obra foi crescendo e prova do seu estatuto de referência na atualidade é a sua participação nos filmes Carolee, Barbara and Gunvor (2018) de Lynne Sachs e Vever (2018), curiosa triangulação das obras de Hammer, Maya Deren e Deborah Stratman, ambos sendo perfeitas ilustrações da sua influência nas gerações de cineastas que lhe seguiram. Barbara Hammer foi uma das primeiras e mais proeminentes vozes a trazer ativamente o lesbianismo para o cinema com filmes como Dyketactics (1974) ou Sisters! (1974), mudando, desta forma, a história do cinema, levando-o a sítios onde ele outrora raramente estivera. A subvalorização do trabalho desta cineasta, confinando a sua relevância ao universo falsamente apartado do cinema queer não lhe faz jus; se alguma coisa, a balcanização cultural que esta atitude evidencia – trata-se de um discreto homólogo do chavão “não tenho nada contra homossexuais, desde que não seja à minha frente!” – dá-nos a ver como a sua luta persiste.

A própria Hammer apercebeu-se da necessidade de reescrever a história a fim de albergar as perspetivas de grupos identitários até então negligenciados pelo domínio masculino, branco e heterossexual e colocou em prática esta reescritura na sua longa-metragem de 2000, History Lessons. Consistindo quase inteiramente em imagens de arquivo, o filme pretende atacar a narrativa que desde sempre e, no caso do cinema, desde a sua invenção, tentou esconder do olhar público o lesbianismo, recentrando as imagens para se focar na perspetiva destas mulheres – parafraseando Hannah Gadsby em Nanette, não bastou Picasso para abrir a cultura a outras perspetivas. O anacronismo da organização das imagens, que mistura tudo desde revistas dos anos 40 a filmes pornográficos dos anos 60, revela uma estagnação de uma atitude condenatória relativamente às lésbicas e às mulheres de um modo geral. Contudo, History Lessons é igualmente celebrativo de cada momento de emancipação e mostra até algum sentido de humor.

(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.comunidadeculturaearte.com/homenagem-a-barbara-hammer-history-lessons-e-a-historia-do-cinema/ (source)

International Lesbian Day: María Galindo – Lesbian and Feminist Militant

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On December 17, 2015, this Bolivian activist, artist and performer, psychologist and radio host was called to testify in La Paz, accused of “destruction or deterioration of state assets and national wealth.” The crime: a street intervention signed by Women creating. The denounced graffiti said “Femicide is a crime of the patriarchal state” and referred to the murder of Andrea Aramayo Álvarez in August of the same year.

María appeared at the Prosecutor’s Office with an uneven scale that hung from her left hand and on her chest a necklace of shattered dolls, a symbol of the outrages on which justice does not have, in Bolivia or anywhere, substantial interference.

With a huge Phrygian on which an open sign was supported like a fan that said “Prosecutor’s Office rhymes with crap”, Maria climbed the three floors by stairs to the screams until she reached the room to give a statement. Although those who have seen her once, always remember her, when Galindo is asked about her daily performativity and about the use of her own image as a fighting tool, she responds to having built it as anyone would do with her own, as if she simply It will be a lady with tied hair and a tailor suit.

(Translated)

El 17 de diciembre de 2015, esta activista boliviana, artista y performer, psicóloga y conductora de radio fue llamada a declarar en La Paz, acusada de “destrucción o deterioro de bienes del Estado y la riqueza nacional”. El delito: una intervención callejera firmada por Mujeres creando. El grafiti denunciado decía “El feminicidio es un crimen del Estado patriarcal” y aludía al asesinato de Andrea Aramayo Álvarez ocurrido en agosto del mismo año.

María se presentó en la Fiscalía con una balanza desnivelada que pendía de su mano izquierda y sobre el pecho un collar de muñecas destrozadas, símbolo de los ultrajes sobre los cuales la justicia no tiene, ni en Bolivia ni en ningún lado, sustancial injerencia.

Con un enorme frigio en el cual se apoyaba un cartel abierto como un abanico que decía “Fiscalía rima con porquería”, María subió los tres pisos por escaleras a los gritos hasta llegar a la sala a prestar declaración. Aunque quienes la han visto una vez, la recuerdan siempre, cuando a Galindo se le pregunta por su performatividad cotidiana y sobre el uso de su propia imagen como herramienta de lucha, ella responde haberla construido como cualquiera haría con la suya, como si simplemente se tratara de una señora de pelo atado y trajecito sastre.

(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.paginasiete.bo/ideas
/2019/8/11/maria-galindo-militante-lesbiana-feminista-226902.html
(source)

International Lesbian Day: Lesbian couple flees Iran, finds home in Columbus

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Sherry Bayegan and Rezi Haghiri sold their popular Persian restaurant in Tehran and all their belongings and left their Iran six years ago. The couple had been under suspicion by the Iranian government for what officials called their “Western” ways, including that they were lesbians, punishable by death in Iran. They said leaving their families was especially difficult. Today, Bayegan and Haghiri live together in the Short North and are working to get a restaurant similar to the one they had in Iran off the ground in the United States.

Continue reading: https://www.dispatch.com/news
/20190922/lesbian-couple-flees-iran-finds-home-in-columbus
(source)

I am Polish, I am a lesbian. I was a brave rebel, today I feel fear above all

Equality Parade

Equality Parade (photo: pexels.com)

It used to be different.
Until quite recently, I was a courageous rebel. I wanted to go out into the streets, shout, protest, write letters, petitions, manifest, and give in. I had that energy, courage, strength. I was proud of it.
Today is simply bad.
I wake up in a country where every day someone compares me to a paedophile. I turn on the internet and see an ad for a newspaper supplement in the form of stickers with the words: “LGBT free zone”. A wave of fear floods me. Just anxiety, not anger, no anger. Only fear is left in me.
(Translated)

Kiedyś było inaczej.
Jeszcze całkiem niedawno byłam odważną buntowniczką. Chciałam wychodzić na ulice, krzyczeć, protestować, pisać listy, petycje, manifestować, udzielać się. Miałam w sobie tę energię, odwagę, siłę. Byłam z tego dumna.
Dziś jest po prostu źle.
Budzę się w kraju, w którym codziennie ktoś mnie porównuje do pedofila. Włączam internet i widzę reklamę dodatku do gazety w postaci naklejek z napisem: „Strefa wolna od LGBT”. Zalewa mnie fala lęku. Właśnie lęku, nie złości, nie gniewu. Został we mnie już tylko strach.
(Original)

Continue reading at: http://www.wysokieobcasy.pl/wysokie-obcasy/7,66725,25016507,ja-polka-ja-lesbijka-bylam-odwazna-buntowniczka-dzis-czuje.html?disableRedirects=true (Source)

Mexico: Lesbians, women in resistance

Love doesn't hurt hate does

Photo: Mario Jiménez Leyva

Vilma Katt Ulloa, lesbofeminist activist, argues that the fight against discrimination based on sexual preference, in Mexico was led by women. Thus, the names of lesbians such as María Castro, Nancy Cárdenas and Alma Margarita Oceguera are inscribed in the story. Over the years, the movement for the vindication of their rights was aimed at making women again invisible under the predominance of machismo and the misogyny also present within the gay community. “There is an internalized lesbophobia that is lived within those letters with which the non-heterosexual population has been characterized.”
(Translated)

Vilma Katt Ulloa, activista lesbofeminista, sostiene que la lucha contra la discriminación por preferencia sexual, en México fueron encabezada por mujeres. Así, dentro de la historia están inscritos los nombres de lesbianas como María Castro, Nancy Cárdenas y Alma Margarita Oceguera. Al paso de los años, el movimiento por la reivindicación de sus derechos fue enfilado a invisibilizar nuevamente a las mujeres bajo la predominación del machismo y la misoginia presente también dentro de la comunidad gay. “Hay una lesbofobia interiorizada la que se vive dentro de esas letras con las que se ha caracterizado a la población no heterosexual”.

Continue reading at: https://www.nvinoticias.com/nota/120109/lesbianas-mujeres-en-resistencia(Source)

Brazil: The lesbian activist who defends LGBT rights in the Amazon

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Dani is the indigenous woman who stars in the second chapter of ‘Rainforest Defenders’ and one of the leaders, at only 21 years old, of the Amazonian resistance to the logging, mining and agrarian threat. But Dani is something else. She is one of the first indigenous women to say openly that she is a lesbian and use her visibility to fight for the LGTB cause in the Amazon.

She belongs to one of the communities that live on the banks of the Tapajós River, a mixture of ancient native settlers, indigenous people, descendants of African slaves and whites of Portuguese origin. Communities that are trying to avoid the exploitation and destruction of their land.

Dani’s community has an advantage over the majority, as it is considered [in] a Conservation Reserve, and therefore temporarily protected from indiscriminate extraction. But the young woman still has to fight against the threats that the extensive cultivation of soy exerts on her land and also against the prejudices of her own community, of the evangelist church, religion they profess, and of her own family .(Translated)

Dani es la indígena que protagoniza el capítulo segundo de ‘Rainforest Defenders’ y una de las líderes, a sus solo 21 años, de la resistencia amazónica frente a la amenaza maderera, minera y agraria. Pero Dani es algo más. Es una de las primeras indígenas en decir abiertamente que es lesbiana y usar su visibilidad para luchar por la causa LGTB en la Amazonia.

Pertenece a una de las comunidades que viven a la vera del río Tapajós, mezcla de antiguos pobladores autóctonos, indígenas, descendientes de esclavos africanos y blancos de origen portugués. Comunidades que están tratando evitar la explotación y destrucción de su tierra.

La comunidad de Dani tiene cierta ventaja frente a la mayoría, pues está considerada como una Reserva de Conservación, y por tanto, protegida temporalmente de la extracción indiscriminada. Pero la joven sigue teniendo que luchar contra las amenazas que el cultivo extensivo de soja ejerce sobre su tierra y también contra los prejuicios de su propia comunidad, de la iglesia evangelista, religión que profesan, y de su propia familia.
(Original)

Continue reading at: http://www.mirales.es/dani-la-indigena-lesbiana-que-defiende-los-derechos-lgtb-en-la-amazonia/ (Source)

(LVD) U.S: Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution

by Amy Dyess

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The lesbian liberation movement is rising. We’re grassroots, and that’s something the elitist, powerful “LGBTQ+” organizations and media can’t buy. That’s why they’re scared of us and why they’re doubling down on their lesbophobic attacks, even for the Lesbian Day of Visibility.
Rebellion and disobedience can come in various forms. It could mean suing your high school or university over anti-lesbian or anti-female discrimination. It could mean creating more art and expanding lesbian culture, as well as organizing group meetings.
Support lesbians by amplifying the hard work women are doing. If you can’t donate to a lesbian’s project then you can still promote and find ways to get involved. Or, start your own project. We need to strengthen the resources we have left while creating new ones to replace those that failed us.
I’m working on an entire album of new music, including a rock ballad tribute to Stormé DeLarverie. A lesbian news and culture site and channel are also on the horizon, and I could use sponsors to help with that, as well as a drama TV series I’m developing about lesbians in the movement.
Whether you’re down on your luck or thriving, I hope “Get the L Out” inspires and energizes you. The lesbian community needs your help, your energy. Stormé had big dyke energy in her era. Now it’s time to make your mark. Welcome to the Lesbian Revolution!

Continue reading: https://medium.com/@amydyess83
/welcome-to-the-lesbian-revolution-7c96e6989805
(status)

Lesbian Visibility Day 2019 (LVD)

By Liz Waterhouse

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, lesbian visibility in even the most lesbian friendly nations is under threat both from traditional sources, and within communities that purport to support us.

We see this evidenced by representation in LGBTI organisation reports and funding:

Data source: Source: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~sfos0060/LGBT_figures.shtml

We also see a decrease in lesbians who feel comfortable naming themselves as such,  under pressure from both a lesbophobic society and a male dominated community, neither of which support female-focused women.

Female-only same sex attraction has faced centuries of opposition as an “immoral” practise, and that opposition has been embraced and reframed lesbianism as exclusionary and bigoted.

Even within media from our own community it is difficult to source information on the global experiences of lesbians, although the lesbians of the world face double oppression as women and homosexuals.

Furthermore we see an ongoing war waged against women who do not demonstrate femininity or comply with the female sex role, with women continuing to be encouraged to see gender non conformity or gender resistance as evidence of masculinity.

And while lesbian visibility is under threat, the concrete situation for lesbians around the world remains dire. The world remains male dominated, with female exploitation underpinning social structures.  The situation is exacerbated by widespread and powerful religious opposition, vestiges of colonial homophobia, brutal racism and the rise in sharply right wing politics in many countries and regions.

On Lesbian Visibility Day 2019, as always, Listening2Lesbians focuses on lesbians, lesbian experiences and lesbian resistance around the world.

We ask you to support lesbians and do the same.

Liz and Ari, Listening2Lesbians

Black Lesbian Resistance and Resilience: Sheila Alexander-Reid

Women in the Life 1994

Women in the Life Magazine in its second year of publication in 1994.

“In 1992, I started Women in the Life, Inc., an events management company that created safe spaces for Black lesbians to interact through dance parties, concerts, fundraisers, and open mic poetry sessions in over 50 locations in Washington, D.C. alone, not to mention Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, and Atlanta. Some of the many artists featured at Women in the Life events included Grace JonesC+C Music FactoryCeCe PenistonMeshell Ndegecocello, R. Erica DoyleSamiya A. BashirKarma Mayet JohnsonPamela SneedMichelle ParkersonVenus ThrashMichaela HarrisonBarbara Tucker, ONYX, and Staceyann Chinn. Over a ten-year period, with the help of friends Charlene Hamilton, Darlene Rogers, Chris Vera, Lois Alexander, the late Phyllis Croom and so many more, I published a total of 86 issues of Women in the Life Magazine, which addressed issues that impacted our community both in Washington, D.C., throughout the United States, and internationally. The magazine was distributed nationally.

Continue reading at: https://thefeministwire.com/2019/02/black-lesbian-resistance-and-resilience/

USA: Lesbian waitress speaks out against hate – I’m not a f@g, I’m a dyke

Michele Crider

I’m not a f@g, I’m a dyke: Michele Crider speaks to the customers who refused to tip her and said “I don’t tip f@gs”

Michele Crider said she was working a lunch shift on Tuesday at the Dash-In restaurant in Fort Wayne, where she has worked for almost a year, when she was assigned a table occupied by two men “who were not that nice.”

Eight years in the service industry have taught her to recognize when customers seem to want their space, she told NBC News in a phone interview Thursday. That seemed to be the case with the two men at this table.

But when Crider, who is gay, went to pick up the check after the men left, she found: “I don’t tip f—,” written on it.

Continue reading at: https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/nbc-out/indiana-waitress-viral-video-addresses-customer-who-wrote-gay-slur-n974191 (Source)