Tag Archives: Monica Briones

When a lesbian dies: the search for justice for Nicole Saavedra and DJ Anna Cook

DJ Anna Cook Nicole Saavedra

We talk about lesbicide when a lesbian is killed for being so. In our society, loving a woman as a woman is one of the greatest insults to masculinity shown by corrective sexual harassment, rapes that serve as a “warning”, and coexistence with mandatory heterosexuality that repeatedly urges you to stay in the closet. Visibility is the political point that links them: Nicole and Anna were visible lesbians, and they pose the question: did they die because they were lesbians?

Francisca Millán is a lawyer specialising in human rights and gender. Partner of the AML study, which is dedicated exclusively to the defence of women in cases involving gender violence. Her project offers a feminist perspective to realise the right of access to justice. Millán affirms that women are violated in the Chilean legal system. In this scenario, being a lesbian is a direct and very specific affront.

“Lesbianism, from hegemonic masculinity, is a resistance to the social order, because I do not submit to heteropatriarchal logic, I am out of it, and I am not willing to occupy that role,” Millán explains.

Crimes that directly affect lesbians for being lesbian are lesbicide (murder of a lesbian)  and corrective rape (rape of a lesbian in order to “correct her”). They do not exist as such in the Chilean penal code, but, according to Millán, mixing the base crimes with the Zamudio Law, they can be put forward as hate crimes.

“Crimes of this nature express a lot of power, and show that there is an exercise of subjugation with respect to others. That is quite common in the case of lesbians: what more obvious way to subjugate a woman who is a lesbian than to force her to practice oral sex, ”says the lawyer.

Carmina Vásquez is a lawyer. She is part of the Lesbofeminist Network, an articulator of organizations whose purpose is to form support networks for lesbians. Their venture, Chueca Bar, will open soon – a lesbian bar that wants to be a safe space within a very hostile city.

“This has been a tough year. There is the case of Carolina Torres (beaten in Pudahuel), we recently learned about violent girls in the Forest Park. That scares you, it happens at five in the afternoon, and it happens in the places where we meet, ”she explains. For her, there is a social punishment for being a lesbian, coupled with being a woman. “These crimes of lesbo-hate go hand in hand with sexual issues under the premise of the” I am going to teach you “type. We talk about corrective violations, which also target a specific type of lesbian: the truck [butch], who defies heteronormal roles, ”she says.

The first recorded and investigated lesophobia crime is that of Mónica Briones, beaten to death in one of the corners of Plaza Italia in 1984. The case accelerated the formation of the first lesbian feminist collective in Chile, Ayuquelén, which existed for 15 years.

“In the year 84, when they killed Monica, it lead to our broad understanding of what happened to us all, the discrimination we were living. But there is no current reflection on hate crimes as they are understood today, ”says Cecilia Riquelme, one of its founders, who last Saturday October 12 participated in the Day of Lesbian Rebellion, in Valparaíso. (Translated)

We talk about lesbianicide when a lesbian is killed for being a lesbian. In our society, loving a woman, being a woman, is one of the insults that most hurts masculinity. From corrective sexual harassment, to violations that serve as a “warning”, and coexistence with compulsory heterosexuality that, many times, urges you to remain “in the closet”. Hence, visibility is the political tool that links them: Nicole and Anna were “visible” lesbians, and they ask the question: did they die from being lesbians?

Francisca Millán is a lawyer specialized in Human Rights and gender. Member of the AML study, which is exclusively dedicated to defending women in cases involving gender violence. Her project offers a feminist perspective to materialize the right of access to justice. Millán affirms that women are violated in the Chilean legal system. In this setting, being a lesbian is a direct and very specific affront.

“Lesbianism, from hegemonic masculinity, is a revelation to the social order, because I do not submit to heteropatriarchal logics, I am outside of it, and I am not willing to occupy those roles,” explains Millán.

Offenses that would directly affect lesbians by virtue of being so would be lesbicide, murder of a lesbian, and corrective rape, rape of a lesbian in order to “correct” her. They do not exist as such in the Chilean penal code, but, according to Millán, by mixing base crimes with the Zamudio Law, hate engines can be relieved.

“Offenses of this nature have a lot of expression of power, and demonstrate that there is this exercise of submission with respect to others. That is something quite common in the case of lesbian women: what more obvious way to subdue a woman who is a lesbian than to force her to perform oral sex, ”says the lawyer.

Carmina Vásquez is a lawyer. She is part of the Lesbian-Feminist Network, an articulator of organizations whose purpose is to form support networks for lesbians. Her venture, Chueca Bar, will open soon, a lesbian bar that wants to be a safe space in a very hostile city.

“This has been a tough year. There is the case of Carolina Torres (beaten in Pudahuel), we recently found out about girls being raped in the Forest Park. That scares you, it happens at five in the afternoon, and it happens in the places where we meet, ”he explains. For her, there is a social punishment for being a lesbian, added to that of being a woman. “These hate-lesbo crimes are coupled with sexual themes under the premise of the I am going to teach you. We are talking about corrective rapes, which are also directed at a specific type of lesbian: the truck, which breaks out of the heteronorm, ”she says.

The first crime of lesbophobia registered and investigated is that of Mónica Briones, beaten to death in one of the corners of Plaza Italia in 1984. The case accelerated the formation of the first lesbian-feminist collective in Chile, Ayuquelén, which worked for 15 years.

“In 1984, when Monica was killed, a broad reflection was generated regarding what was happening to all of us, the discrimination we were experiencing. But there is no specific reflection on hate crimes as they are understood today, ”says Cecilia Riquelme, one of its founders, who participated in the Day of Lesbian Rebellions on Saturday, October 12, in Valparaíso.
(Original)

Excerpts from Romina Reyes’ article.
Continue reading at:  https://www.theclinic.cl/2019/10/16/cuando-muere-una-lesbiana-la-busqueda-de-justicia-para-nicole-saavedra-y-anna-cook/  (Source )

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International Lesbian Day: Monica Briones – The woman killed in dictatorship, that inspires the Day of Lesbian Visibility

monica-brioness.png

The brutal murder of the 34-year-old painter and sculptor became a mystery to justice. In parallel, for organizations the figure of the artist has become a source of inspiration to boost the fight for lesbian rights. More than three decades after the crime, activism accuses that the hatred and injustices that haunted the death of women remain as present as before. This July 9, the lesbian feminist groups will make a request to the Monuments Council to install a memorial in the place where she was killed.

Bold, talented and bold, they are the adjectives that are most repeated when asked about Monica Briones Puccio. “A woman ahead of her time,” they will say here and there. Owner of an outstanding talent for painting and sculpture, an innate artist who became one of the most relevant figures for the lesbian movement in Chile.

Monica was a proud lesbian, with a masculine gender expression and decided to face her sexual orientation at a very young age, opening the door – possibly – to the greatest violence and oppressions she would live later, even in the family. But the truth is that in 1984, in full dictatorship, at 34, Monica lived life with passion and was the protagonist of intense love relationships that would mark her.

Two days after her birthday, on July 9, while she was retiring from the last of several celebrations, at the exit of the Jaque Mate bar and while waiting for the bus to return home, the painter was beaten to death. His attacker kicked her on the ground until her skull fractured.

The story of Monica Briones has inspired television reports, a chronicle of Pedro Lemebel, plays and even a movie. Thus, more than three decades after his death, the artist’s memory has remained in force in the memory of those who have empathized with the case.

“A creative and different woman,” titled a magazine of the time with a small profile of the artist. There she confessed, probably to an insistent journalist: “I have not married because it would take time from my art.”

In that same article he sentenced that he was not afraid of death, because he knew he would die young.

(Translated)

El brutal homicidio de la pintora y escultora de 34 años se convirtió en un misterio para la justicia. En paralelo, para las organizaciones la figura de la artista se ha transformado en una fuente de inspiración para impulsar la lucha por los derechos de las lesbianas. A más de tres décadas del crimen, el activismo acusa que el odio y las injusticias que rondaron la muerte de la mujer siguen tan presentes como antes. Este 9 de julio, las agrupaciones lesbofeministas harán ingreso de una solicitud al Consejo de Monumentos para instalar un memorial en el lugar donde fue asesinada. Esta es su historia.

Atrevida, talentosa y audaz, son los adjetivos que más se repiten al preguntar por Mónica Briones Puccio. “Una mujer adelantada a su época”, dirán aquí y allá. Dueña de un talento descollante para la pintura y la escultura, una artista innata que se convirtió en una de las figuras más relevantes para el movimiento lésbico en Chile.

Mónica era una lesbiana orgullosa, con expresión de género masculina y decidió enfrentar su orientación sexual a muy corta edad, abriendo la puerta -posiblemente- a las mayores violencias y opresiones que viviría después, incluso en el seno familiar. Pero lo cierto es que en 1984, en plena dictadura, a sus 34 años, Mónica vivía la vida con pasión y era protagonista de intensas relaciones amorosas que la marcarían.

A dos días de su cumpleaños, un 9 de julio, mientras se retiraba de la última de varias celebraciones, a la salida del bar Jaque Mate y mientras esperaba la micro para volver a su casa, la pintora fue golpeada hasta la muerte. Su atacante la pateó en el suelo hasta que su cráneo se fracturó.

La historia de Mónica Briones ha inspirado reportajes televisivos, una crónica de Pedro Lemebel, obras de teatro y hasta una película. Así, a más de tres décadas de su muerte, el recuerdo de la artista se ha mantenido vigente en la memoria de quienes han empatizado con el caso.

“Una mujer creativa y distinta”, tituló una revista de la época con una pequeña semblanza de la artista. Allí ella confesó, probablemente a un insistente periodista: “No me he casado porque quitaría tiempo a mi arte”.

En ese mismo artículo sentenció que no le temía a la muerte, porque sabía que moriría joven.

(Original)

Continue reading: https://www.eldesconcierto.cl/2019/07/09/el-recuerdo-insistente-de-monica-briones-la-mujer-asesinada-en-dictadura-que-inspira-el-dia-de-la-visibilidad-lesbica/ (source)