Tag Archives: Lesbian history

5 lesbian activist groups who fought for us

Lesbians have always been at the forefront of the fight for LGBT rights, but sometimes lesbian activist groups were needed to fight for space on lesbian rights and issues.  This is because, as Canadian journalist and activist Judy Rebick had noted, that while lesbians were part of the women’s movement, their issues were invisible in the movement.  Aside from Daughters of Bilitis to the Lesbian Avengers, here are five more groups that let people know that lesbians can’t be pushed around.

Continue reading at: 5 lesbian activist groups who fought for us | Lesbian News (Source)

Adrienne Rich: Poet, activist, and lesbian

Adrienne Rich is considered one of preeminent American poets. But she’s also well-known for her political stance as feminist and activist.

Continue reading at: Adrienne Rich: Poet, activist, and lesbian | Lesbian News (Source)

The Lesbian Avengers 25 Years Later: “We Did It, And We Can Do It Again”

“It’s good to remember that activism works,” she tells me, “because everyone needs a sense of hope right now.” Cogswell and her former Lesbian Avenger cohorts are hopeful the exhibition will help reignite that DIY activist spark, and bridge the gap between the movement’s history and our current challenges.

Continue reading at: The Lesbian Avengers 25 Years Later: “We Did It, And We Can Do It Again” | NewNowNext (Source)

Georgia: City honors life of first out lesbian Fulton County Commissioner Joan Garner

Poster

Several hundred mourners gathered on Saturday to honor the life of the late Fulton County Commissioner Joan Garner, who died of breast cancer on April 18. Garner was a beloved community figure and the first openly LGBT Fulton County Commissioner.

Garner made an impact in a variety of different communities and circles throughout her life, and speakers at the service at Ebenzer Baptist Church reflected on the legacy she left through her work in neighborhoods, as county commissioner, as an Atlanta intown activist, as a champion for those in need and her work in social justice and LGBT rights.

Continue reading at: City honors life of late Fulton County Commissioner Joan Garner (Source)

Elaine Noble: The first lesbian state lawmaker

If you’re feeling hopeless with our current crop of legislators in Congress, consider Elaine Noble– the first out lesbian elected to state legislature– and be inspired.

Elaine Noble made US election history even before Maura Healey, Harvey, Milk, or Tammy Baldwin as she was elected as representative of the Boston district in the Massachusetts House of Representatives in 1974.

Prior to this, no out lesbian (or gay man, for that matter), had won a state-level office. So when she did run for the position, she faced an overwhelming wave of homophobic threats.

Continue reading at: Elaine Noble: The first lesbian state lawmaker | Lesbian News (Source)

Honoring Del Martin, Lesbian Rights Pioneer

Sometimes you just want to fox-trot or cha-cha. Since it was often illegal for same-sex couples to dance together in public places in the 1950s, Del Martin and her partner, Phyllis Lyon, founded the Daughters of Bilitis, one of the first lesbian organizations in the United States, in 1955. But the DOB was much more than just a place to dance freely: In those dark days, it was a beacon of light, a refuge, and a bit of a miracle.

Continue reading at: Honoring Del Martin, Lesbian Rights Pioneer – Vogue (Source)

Lesbian Herstory Archives – Brooklyn, New York

The women were also concerned about how difficult it was to get any information about lesbian history through traditional academic channels. Even when it could be found, the research process itself could be dehumanizing, requiring searching under categories like “deviant” and “abnormal.”

Continue reading at: Lesbian Herstory Archives – Brooklyn, New York – Atlas Obscura (Source)

Margarethe Cammermeyer breaks the military silence

Cammermeyer stepped into the spotlight when, despite being a decorated soldier, she was given an honorable discharge on June 11, 1992.  This came following her admission that she was a lesbian during a routine security clearance interview in 1989.  Though this dashed her dream of becoming a Chief Nurse of the National Army Guard, it started her on the road of legal disputes as she filed a lawsuit against the decision in civil court.  This paid off in June 1994, when Judge Thomas Zilly of the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington ruled that her discharge and the ban on homosexuals serving in the military were unconstitutional.

Continue reading at: Margarethe Cammermeyer breaks the military silence | Lesbian News (Source)

Uganda: Lesbian refugee shares her story 

Yudaya is a member of Out and Proud Africa which is an African Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Intersex rights and human rights activist charity. Their mission is to defend human dignity, freedom, justice and equality for LGBTI people in Africa.

Continue watching at: WATCH: This refugee’s story will open your eyes to the fears LGBTIs face in Uganda (Source)

Australian research project documents lesbian witch-hunts in military before ban lifted

“They were doing these big witch-hunts on us… it was terrifying to a 17-year-old kid,” Jeffries said. “They’d been following us. They’d done a log, like at 2.35 on Thursday afternoon you drove 4.6km and you stopped at this hamburger shop, then you drove down the river and were there for 3.5 hours.”

Continue reading at: This Is What Happened To Gay People In The Military Before The Ban Was Lifted (Source)

In Memoriam: Lesbian Murder Victims

An amazing blog dedicated to the memory of lesbians murdered.  Listening 2 Lesbians would like to thank the blogger who is doing this important work.  We will update this post as changes are made to the original blog.

“Lesbians are very often undercounted as murder victims–both within the so-called LGBT community and by those who monitor violence against women. This is a beginning effort to honor the names of the lesbians that have been lost.”

Continue reading at: In Memoriam: Lesbian Murder Victims (Source)

This Powerful Instagram Chronicles Important Moments In Lesbian Herstory

Lesbian Herstory Project

Rakowski went on to talk about how lesbian history often tends to take a backseat to other identities along the queer spectrum when it comes to visibility and how history is remembered.“Women’s history is often not told or recorded or championed, lesbian history even less so,” she continued. “I think it’s valuable to learn from the past, learn what lesbians were experiencing and thinking in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s — there’s been so much progress is society but still so much oppression. Even if I don’t agree with lesbian views from the 1970s (for example) I still think it’s important we learn and read and respect their history and experiences.”

Continue reading at: This Powerful Instagram Chronicles Important Moments In Lesbian Herstory | The Huffington Post (Source)

The serendipitous path of Roberta Kaplan 

Roberta Kaplan was once described by Arianna Huffington during a live interview at Fortune as “a powerhouse corporate litigator.”In the corporate legal field, brilliant litigators are a dime a dozen. But what differentiated Kaplan was that she met Edie Windsor and the two teamed up in a David and Goliath kind of a legal case.With Windsor, Kaplan entered the history books in 2013 when the Supreme Court invalidated certain sections of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in the case of United States v. Windsor. This case later led to the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges two years later that struck down all barriers to same-sex marriage across the US. For a lot of the LGBT people, it was serendipity: the fearlessness of Windsor partnered with the passion of Kaplan.Thanks to these two lesbians, America could now enjoy the rights of same-sex marriage.

Continue reading at: The serendipitous path of Roberta Kaplan | Lesbian News (Source)

The Amazon Trail: Questions from a lesbian high school student

What still needs to be achieved in the current movement?

“So much. We will never erase all of the hate and fear directed at gay people. Difference is too threatening to many non-gays, especially those who follow religions that demonize us. Being out is the essential basic step to achieving and preserving something like equality. Encouraging and supporting one another, as the Golden Crown Literary Society and lesbian publishers do, for example, are necessary. Legitimizing our right to exist through the legal system will protect us to some extent. Electing supportive non-gays and gays to local and national office is another tool that can protect us in the future. Fighting demagogues every step of the way is a must. We will continue building our culture until it’s so strong our would-be oppressors and executioners can’t begin to tear it down.”

Continue reading at: The Amazon Trail: Questions from a lesbian high school student | LGBT Weekly (Source)

Sale of Phase 1 ends 45-year run of lesbian bar

Phase 1, a lesbian bar that has operated in the Barrack’s Row section of Capitol Hill since 1970, became a part of gay bar history last month when its building, owned by Phase 1 co-founder Allen Carroll, sold for $3.3 million, according city tax records.

Continue reading at: Sale of Phase 1 ends 45-year run of lesbian bar (Source)

Joanna Russ: Science fiction writer, feminist, & lesbian

In a field dominated by men during her time, Joanna Russ not only broke the glass ceiling in turns of writing science fiction but also offering a critique of the genre.

A radical feminist and academic, Russ is now known for her unique, seminal thinking while also being an entertaining science fiction novelist who wrote challenging stories loaded with passion and wit.

What’s more, she was an out lesbian who was not afraid to let the world know who she was, while the few women who wrote SF during her time had to hide using male pseudonyms (like Alice Sheldon a.k.a. James Tiptree, Jr.).

Continue reading at: Joanna Russ: Science fiction writer, feminist, & lesbian | Lesbian News (Source)